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Messara report... Luv it!

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Desperate or what ... Don't think, don't analyse, just buy it folk!

Subject: STAKEHOLDER MESSAGE: Messara Report - please show your support

 

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Dear Stakeholders,

The Messara Report is a very important once-in-a-generation opportunity to secure thoroughbred racing’s future.  Changes to industry governance, potential outsourcing, and racefields legislation are game-changers offering real improvements in our financial returns.  We are working through Mr Messara’s proposals about venue location and ownership to find a solution that is fair for all, but we cannot afford to get hung up on one matter when we need to show the Government we are a united industry.

NZTR, together with our Recognised Industry Organisations, strongly support and endorse the need for a circuit breaker.

This is our only chance for change.  We must show the Government that it’s time for change, and we seek you support to make it happen.

Click here to show your support for the Messara Report's goals & principles

Minister's media release (13.09.2018)

We also encourage you to put forward your own submissions.  These can be emailed to [email protected]ovt.nz.

Yours sincerely,

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Dr Alan Jackson
Chairman
New Zealand Thoroughbred Racing Inc.

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Bernard Saundry
Chief Executive
New Zealand Thoroughbred Racing Inc.

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The industry has bought itself to a position where there is no future , in 10 years the few scraps that are available today will be gone .  The fact is today over 50% of trainers are 60 years old or older , when they are gone what then , nothing , without change we have nothing to encourage younger people into the industry , it will die .

The time for radical change is here , sure we can nit pick over the proposal and cause delays but what good would that do , we could argue over race fields legislation but why , it's an internationally accepted  strategy , it works in many jurisdictions around the world ,  one way or another change will happen so suck it up and click the support button and let's get on with it .

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17 minutes ago, tripple alliance said:

The industry has bought itself to a position where there is no future , in 10 years the few scraps that are available today will be gone .  The fact is today over 50% of trainers are 60 years old or older , when they are gone what then , nothing , without change we have nothing to encourage younger people into the industry , it will die .

The time for radical change is here , sure we can nit pick over the proposal and cause delays but what good would that do , we could argue over race fields legislation but why , it's an internationally accepted  strategy , it works in many jurisdictions around the world ,  one way or another change will happen so suck it up and click the support button and let's get on with it .

You sound as desperate as they do. The racefields legislation, I'd say almost every one supports. Didn't really need to be in the report. Most of the rest is cobblers, and racefields is not the panacea that some make out especially if less and less people are betting on NZ racing.

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How many times did he say "step-change" in that interview? Hilarious!

Guffipedia

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Lucy Kellaway’s dictionary of business jargon and corporate nonsense
 
 
Step change

Translation into plain English Change

Perpetrator Lord Green, Church of England

Usage example "We are proposing a radical step change in our development of leaders who can shape and articulate a compelling vision and who are skilled and robust enough to create spaces of safe uncertainty in which the Kingdom grows."

Lucy’s commentary Our Lord, looking down on a sentence in which His Kingdom was obliterated by a dozen dreary management clichés, must have found his genius for forgiveness sorely tested. Winner of inaugural Fallen Angel Award, 2014.

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24 minutes ago, gubellini said:

Step-change has replaced best practice as the latest mantra. What will be the next one?!

According to this it was considered defunct a decade ago. Corporate jargon is one thing. Antique corporate jargon another. Amusing to listen to though.

Mind your jargon-laden language

Local Government Association lists 250 words of jargon that public sector workers should stop using

Ian Tucker

Thu 11 Mar 2010 15.13 GMT First published on Thu 11 Mar 2010 15.13 GMT

The folks down at the Local Government Association have today published a list of some 250 words that "should not be used by the public sector when providing information to the public". The argot has been drawn from central, regional and local government, quangos, business management speak and, not unexpectedly, the EU.

The LGA's chairman Dame Margaret Eaton, says:

"The public sector must not hide behind impenetrable jargon and phrases. Why do we have to have a webinar [meeting held over the internet] trialogue [discussion between three groups with different ideologies] for the wellderly [older people who are not sick, once used by Harriet Harman] when the public sector could just talk about caring for the elderly instead?"

One assumes the longer and more incomprehensible the words, the higher the consultancy fees you can charge. After all as an "advocate" for "blue sky thinking" and "customer insight" you are very "cashable".

Some of the terms on the LGA danger list reflect the times we live in. For instance New Labour terms like social exclusion, cohesiveness, third sector and step change are history. There are words that leave you wondering in what context they were used in the first place, terms such as 'brain dump', 'low hanging fruit' and 'thought shower'. There are others that would make Ron Atkinson proud like "early win". Personally I'm sad to see the end of "holistic governance" – I wouldn't mind being a subject of that regime.

But jargon addicts (who may recall Tony Wright MP's report on "bad language" last year) will be relieved to note that we're only talking about communication with the public here. If in the privacy of your own "goldfish bowl facilitated conversation" (has anyone heard that said out loud?) you wish to continue "thinking outside the box", making "headroom for change" or having a "gateway review" you're fine, as long as what is said in meeting stays in meeting.

But if you must have an "ideas shower" please remember your flip flops.

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Racefields legislation is   nothing without product, who's going to pay big coin at the moment for some of the product on offer. I cannot see likes of Betfair , Betfred , Betdaq  or Bet Midler paying through the nose for 6 races for likes of 6 maiden races at   New Plymouth midweek in a poor time slot for international punters.Just put on more  cartoon  races for the desperate overseas punters who need a punting fix at 9am . Plus they will smell the desperation  for cash and circle like sharks to get cheap deal fillers. The money I've heard banded around on weigh in and the like , crazy stuff , won't happen. Hope it does though for sake of industry. 

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On 9/24/2018 at 3:19 PM, tripple alliance said:

The industry has bought itself to a position where there is no future , in 10 years the few scraps that are available today will be gone .  The fact is today over 50% of trainers are 60 years old or older , when they are gone what then , nothing , without change we have nothing to encourage younger people into the industry , it will die .

The time for radical change is here , sure we can nit pick over the proposal and cause delays but what good would that do , we could argue over race fields legislation but why , it's an internationally accepted  strategy , it works in many jurisdictions around the world ,  one way or another change will happen so suck it up and click the support button and let's get on with it .

The blind following the blind.

So your idea of radical change is destruction of the industry.

Its quite obvious Messara is clueless when it comes to the internet. Lets be clear wagering is an Internet business.

So I'll recite a little story. Back in about 2000 Google were a smaller business than NZTAB are now. In fact much smaller but were seeking capital. The Wall Street "expert" analysts all reported that the Google model had no prospect of succeeding and advised everyone to stay clear of Google.

But Google had a simple idea. Align with business. So they started offering  little non graphic adverts and suddenly everything  changed. The same can apply to Amazon, Facebook etc etc. Amazon doesn't just sell books they rake in billions with advertising.  BUT. will general business align with wagering. Probably not but they will if racing clubs control wagering.

Therefore its essential that wagering gets back to racing clubs control so they can use wagering as a marketing tool. Thats the future for racing.

Google nowadays acts like a vacuum cleaner they suck millions out of the economy of countries like New Zealand. There is nothing complicated about wagering. New Zealand doesn't need long term the likes of TABCORP Paddy Power or the other parasitic outfits e.g. UBER who all may have had the initial bright ideas. Surely New Zealanders can be enterprising..

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Can we agree we we need to attract young people to the sport.  How else do we increase punting revenue and owners numbers.

This has been the key to the Australians relative success.  The other thing Australia ha,d was a supportive government which for once we also have.

This growth sure isn't going to come from the old curmudgeons who would rather see the industry die than merge with another club.

To attract the next generation we need a product that is on a different level to what the old curmudgeons are used to.

I'm so sick of the whining and negativity these relics of the industry spout as they try to drag the industry back to the glory days of the 50's which is 

just an unobtainable dream.  If your not part of the future, then do the rest of us a favour and join a bowls club so you can destroy that industry rather than this one.

 

 

 

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On 9/27/2018 at 4:00 PM, Gofta said:

Can we agree we we need to attract young people to the sport.  How else do we increase punting revenue and owners numbers.

This has been the key to the Australians relative success.  The other thing Australia ha,d was a supportive government which for once we also have.

This growth sure isn't going to come from the old curmudgeons who would rather see the industry die than merge with another club.

To attract the next generation we need a product that is on a different level to what the old curmudgeons are used to.

I'm so sick of the whining and negativity these relics of the industry spout as they try to drag the industry back to the glory days of the 50's which is 

just an unobtainable dream.  If your not part of the future, then do the rest of us a favour and join a bowls club so you can destroy that industry rather than this one.

 

 

 

You are wrong on a number of points. Attracting young people to racing through punting is a disaster. It should be done through participation not punting. Punting will take care of itself.

Your old curmugeons quote is baffling. Are you saying Winston Peters falls into that category. Making sweeping statements like that is a sign of immaturity.

Dragging the industry to the "glory days" somehow in your mind is wrong. Perhaps the industry should be totally eliminated then you'll be happy.

There is a place for everyone in the industry. trying to make it exclusive like you are is perhaps where the problem has always been.

Your final sentence is frankly ageist abusive. In other words judges, politicians. senior managers should all go bowling. Frankly quite stupid.

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The fight back has begun , I think if any course deserves to be saved down our way it's Winton ,  on reserve land and in great nick ,  the stands are old but are well maintained as are the tracks and tie up stalls are brilliant .   Perhaps a few facts might help in these situations , we have had two  meetings this week , Winton and Waipukerau , why not ask NZracing and the  harness code to present a breakdown of costs to stage these meetings and how much profit was made , if these tracks made a profit then they should stay , if not then that's a different matter . 

The Gore Racing Club is reaching out to the eastern Southland community for support to help retain thoroughbred racing in town

President Justine Abernethy said support had been received from many areas of the district since a racing report, released in August, recommended 20 galloping tracks, including Gore and Winton, close within six years.

Regular Gore racegoer Gladys Gerken, 85, said she was angry at the possibility of the track closing.

"I was disgusted when I first heard about. I've been coming to Gore race meetings for more than 70 years. Abernethy said the Gore District Council and Mataura Licensing Trust were helping with information for the submissions. The council and trust were providing facts and figures on the importance thoroughbred racing had on the eastern Southland economy.   

 

 

 

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Oops she's about to hit the fan , no money in the near future and the possibility of stake decreases .

Racing's "race fields" legislation, promoted under National as a key driver to turning around the fortunes of the ailing industry, has been withdrawn from Parliament. Chief executive John Allen said the legislation, which sought to get fees from overseas bookmakers taking bets on New Zealand races, would have benefited the board by about "a million dollars a month" The bill, that sought to make numerous amendments to the Racing Act 2003 designed to improve the competitiveness of the New Zealand Racing Board's betting operations 

"The Racing Amendment Bill took several years to develop and involved extensive consultation with the whole racing industry.

"The bill had the support of the whole industry and was set to provide a multi-million dollar injection into the racing and sporting codes, which would have flowed through to race stakes.

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Everyone keeps going on about how much racecourses are used outside racing for the good of the communities, can anyone with knowledge actually tell me how much clubs make from this so called activity. 

Just would like to get a handle on this as it seems to be a great myth.

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6 hours ago, scooby3051 said:

Everyone keeps going on about how much racecourses are used outside racing for the good of the communities, can anyone with knowledge actually tell me how much clubs make from this so called activity. 

Just would like to get a handle on this as it seems to be a great myth.

These days community support is a myth , we have an article in the Southland Times concerning the Gore track , in the comments section only 6 comments after 2 days , people are not interested .

I was watching the coverage of Waipukurau the other day  , almost no one on track , the community weren't there and no doubt serious money was lost by the industry , another article published the other day was an interesting read .

Craig McNeill understands the uncertainty smaller clubs are feeling because he was on the committee of the Feilding Jockey Club that made the decision to move to the Awapuni Racing Centre in 1999. 

When the club made its decision to centralise, it flourished, with prize money increasing significantly. 

Feilding Jockey Club's fortunes turned after it relocated to Awapuni.

In 1999, it struggled to conduct three low-key midweek race meetings at its course, McNeill said. 

"The Feilding Cup that year was run for just $8000.  

"Today, the $50,000 Ricoh Feilding Gold Cup is a listed open handicap race, with the club offering $232,500 prize money on this day, which is more than they paid out for their three meetings in the 1998-99 season."

McNeill said a lot of people did not realise moving made them stronger, and that was something other clubs would come to accept.

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McNeill on Feilding gives a positive live example, but the Committees of Gore, Timaru & Smallsville won't listen. Every report ever commissioned, including Messara's, indicates Teeny, Tiny and Dwarf need to close and merge with a larger track nearby. Everyone in racing has always agreed that needs to happen, so long as they aren't one of them. Just heard John Allen on Weigh In, who like all before him, use the catch phrase "the clubs need to consult and talk amongst one another to form a solution", but what he is really saying is "I run this organisation but don't think I'm going to do what is right!!" First we had The Two Ronnies, then Hale & Pace, now we have John & Glenda.

Adopt the Messara report in it's totality, he has a track record more impressive than anyone involved in NZ racing (paid or unpaid). Every participant in racing wants change, requires increased returns, needs better facilities, but when a plan is presented no one wants to start. 

I'm now comfortable knowing, once NZ Racing is gone, we will still have NSW & Victorian racing each week, light years ahead of NZ racing anyway, with Brisbane, Adelaide & Perth carnivals thrown in for good measure. 

Support Messara..........................in total.........................or accept what we have will remain, but in an even more declining form and every participant moaning even louder than they do now!!   

 

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23 hours ago, Jefferson said:

McNeill on Feilding gives a positive live example,

I think you are missing the point Jefferson. Have you had a look at what net revenue is generated from the $232,500 of stakes at that FJC meeting? Might make the club feel better because they no longer provide or have to cover the stakes but totally unsustainable.

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