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Ihumatao: Serious Questions after Treasury Opposed Deal

 

David Seymour 

 

New Zealanders will be demanding answers after learning that the Government’s chief economic adviser opposed its efforts to solve the dispute at Ihumatao”, says ACT Leader David Seymour.

“The Government purchased the land at Ihumatao for $29.9 million through the Land for Housing Programme, a fund set up to deliver KiwiBuild homes. The goal of that fund was for the Government to purchase land, on-sell it to developers, and contract those developers to rapidly provide new housing.

“But Treasury’s advice to Finance Minister Grant Robertson was that purchasing Ihumatao in this way was ‘at odds with Land for Housing’s intent, operating model, and scopes of related appropriations.’

“There’s certainly no evidence that housing will be built at Ihumatao anytime soon. If anything, the deal has reduced the number of homes that would have been built.

“Treasury warned that there was ‘a risk that Audit considers the expense does not fit within the appropriation scope and is unappropriated spend.’

A government can only lawfully spend public money if Parliament has authorised spending for a particular purpose.

“Treasury’s advice raises serious questions about whether that has occurred. Taxpayers deserve to know why the Government has decided to take this course of action.

“The Finance Minister seems to have been so desperate to solve a political headache at 

Ihumatao that he has simply reached for the closest pot of money.

 
The_BFD-Cartoon-SonovaMin-NZ-Politics-ta

The BFD. Cartoon credit SonovaMin

 

“Jacinda Ardern inflamed the situation at Ihumatao and her Government appears to have abused taxpayer money in trying to solve it.”

 

 

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Ardern’s Luck Has Run Out

Lockdown and Border Closure Foreshadow the End of Ardern

By Suze

The ‘Covid Queen’ started her political career as the ‘Crisis Queen’, rising to international stardom on lucky breaks provided by the politically motivated exploitation of cyclical weather changes (initially named global warming then renamed climate change), the Christchurch killings and then the White Island eruption. All attracted global media attention.

The_BFD-TIME-MAGAZINE-match-cover-jacind The BFD. The magazine hit shelves March 2. Photo credit: TIME Magazine

These lucky breaks provided an opportunity for Ardern’s political ambitions and distracted media scrutiny from her recurrent failures in addressing child poverty or providing low-cost housing. But the best, however, was yet to come.

COVID-19 overtook all previous disasters combined and the ‘Covid Queen’ rose up to replace the ‘Crisis Queen’ in 2020.

 
cartoon-The-BFD-SonovaMin-queen-of-the-c Covid Queen. The BFD. Cartoon credit SonovaMin

Lucky breaks had returned Ardern to government, but they will not keep her there, because her luck has run out. The Covid Queen’s time is now up.

The misfortune of another crisis will not be met with the same fawning gratitude from an adoring public, simply because the curtain is slowly pulling back on arguably one of the worst performances of any New Zealand government.

We have spent more on Covid relief than any other country measured, equivalent to 21.3 per cent of GDP, “to achieve one of the worst economic outcomes in the OECD“.

$75M media bailouts have kept the hard questions at bay but this is changing. Australian media weren’t given financial reward to speak kindly of Ardern, and it won’t be long before the Ardern fan club is forced to come to terms with her failure to protect us from looming financial disaster.

“… while New Zealand, a small island nation, has controlled the virus well, it has done so at massive economic and fiscal cost.

Were it not for its overinvestment in forests, which are now encroaching on valuable arable land, the Ardern government would be a very long way from meeting its commitments under the Paris agreement. It’s also trying to fudge the figures by using an absolute figure for 2005 and a net figure for 2030, hoping no one notices.”

 
Spectator

Finally someone in the media, albeit the Australian media, is taking notice.

Business owners know a lucky break helps to establish their business but hard graft and good management are required to keep the doors open.

Listen closely and you will hear the sound of business doors up and down the country closing. Hospitality businesses established decades ago are closing permanently after the ‘Covid Queen’ crippled them along with the international travel and tourism industry and the seasonal produce sector.

40 years of strawberry growing didn’t help Perry’s Berries when the ‘Covid Queen’ refused to allow seasonal labourers into the country to pick the fruit which is now left to rot on the ground. Their doors have now closed and it is heartbreaking.

A 24 year history couldn’t keep Auckland’s O’Connell Street Bistro open. They close next month.

Queenstown was hit very hard. After 29 years one of Queenstown’s longest running independent restaurants shut its doors last month. The owner said “The resort had been ‘cut adrift’ by the Government, and he wondered who would be left standing in the town centre when international visitors eventually returned.”

The ‘Covid Queen’ and her media buddies tell us – with straight faces – that Covid destroyed our economy. They are lying!

It wasn’t Covid that closed the borders and locked us down. It was Jacinda Ardern’s government.

Ardern’s government did nothing to help our Pacific neighbours either; the source of our missing seasonal labour this summer.

Last year the Covid-free Cook Islands begged Ardern to allow international travel but their pleas fell on her deaf ears. They are still Covid-free and are still waiting on a go-ahead from Ardern’s government.

“Fiji hasn’t had a community case in around a year – Samoa and Tonga have never had one,” she [Judith Collins] told Newshub Nation on Saturday.

“We need to support our Pacific neighbours with tourism because they have just gone through devastating economic times.”

RNZ reports Samoa’s economy collapsed by 8.6 percent in the 12 months to the end of September 2020.”

Judith Collins on Newshub Nation

It is no surprise to discover our own economy is finally showing the effects of Ardern’s devastating lockdowns and border closure with a 2.9% drop in GDP over 2020.

Predictably, the Finance Minister was upbeat saying “New Zealand had come through the COVID-19 pandemic better than expected.”

Perhaps he meant the Covid mortality rate was better than expected because he is dead wrong about the financial fallout – the worst is yet to come – not from Covid (as this government and its media sycophants would have you believe) but because of the crippling lockdowns and border closure.

Has Ardern finally come to terms with the fact that the results of her government’s Covid mismanagement are just around the corner? Missing an excellent PR opportunity last week with the America’s Cup win was totally uncharacteristic.

However they frame it, the writing is on the wall for the Ardern government: they can no longer pass off their mismanagement as bad luck or Covid.

Ardern’s government will go simply because they didn’t do their jobs properly. The only question is, how long will it take before their fan club wakes up and rejects them?

 

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We can only hope:

 

Rumours of a prime-ministerial resignation may be intended to head-off something considerably more dramatic on the policy front, Chris Trotter suggests
Chris Trotter's picture
22nd Mar 21, 7:28am
 
 
 
image001%20%287%29.jpg
Jacinda Ardern & Grant Robertson.

By Chris Trotter*

 

There are all kinds of political rumours, but they don’t get much bigger than: “The PM is about to resign.” When that rumour was relayed to me on Friday morning, my initial reaction was “Bullshit!” Wellington is a very intimate capital city, so the idea that such an important story could somehow be kept from the Parliamentary Press Gallery, struck me as fanciful. Were it not for the fact that my informant was “a usually reliable source”, I would have given the matter no more than a dismissive shake of the head. Instead, I decided to make some calls.

As I suspected, nothing remotely resembling a resignation rumour had been picked up by the Press Gallery. What I did hear, however, were concerns about “Jacinda”. The Prime Minister, I was told, was “out of sorts”, “morose”, “not her usual self”. Among female journalists, I discovered, there was much speculation about whether or not the PM was pregnant. Scuttlebutt, I thought to myself. Although, I had to concede, the PM’s sunny disposition has, of late, given every appearance of having fallen under a cloud. Even to the casual observer, Jacinda seems distracted.

It is doubtful whether her overall mood was uplifted by the latest poll results. Though Labour still hovers around its Election Night 50%, the TV1-Colmar Brunton survey showed Ardern falling a statistically significant 15 percentage points in the Preferred-Prime-Minister stakes.

 

It is likely that these latest numbers only accentuated the PM’s dissatisfaction with the way she and her government are being represented in the newspaper columns and across social media. This dissatisfaction turned out to be one of the most consistent themes of my Friday-morning soundings. The PM, it is alleged, has been stung by the sharp criticisms of her administration which have been growing in intensity since Labour’s landslide victory last October. At the heart of these critiques lie two inter-related questions: “Why the preternatural caution, Jacinda. What, or who, is stopping you?”

While New Zealanders understood the role played by Winston Peters and NZ First in reining-in the PM’s “transformational” aspirations (and were, accordingly, prepared to forgive Labour’s less-than-stellar record of achievement on the big issues of homelessness and child poverty) after 17 October 2020, that excuse was no longer available. Not when Labour, the Greens and Te Paati Maori between them command 77 seats in New Zealand’s 120-seat House of Representatives.

Labour’s caution and timidity were attributed (often none-too-kindly) to the party’s determination to hold on to the huge swag of former National Party voters who had defected to Labour in recognition of the PM’s outstanding handling of the Covid-19 Pandemic. Commentators mused that “Jacinda” was little more than a brand; and that, for all her talk about “the politics of kindness”, Ardern was just another party leader with one over-riding priority – winning the next election. Perhaps the unkindest cut of all came from one of Ardern’s most reliable supporters on social media. Martyn Bradbury, Editor of The Daily Blog. Playing on the left-wing swearword “Neoliberalism”, Bradbury described the PM as a media-savvy purveyor of “Neo-kindness”.

The message coming back to me throughout Friday was that these accusations had hurt. That the PM was feeling keenly the lack of faith in her bona fides – especially from those who are regarded as being (and who certainly see themselves as being) on the Left. I was told that over the summer Ardern’s determination to keep her promises to the homeless, the poor, and the planet had grown ever-stronger. That she refused to go down in history as an instinctively empathic crisis-manager. That someone who could pull off an electoral rout on the scale of 17 October required an altogether more substantial legacy. The word began to spread through Wellington’s labyrinthine corridors of power that “something big” could be expected on the policy front by the middle of the year.

Hearing this, I wondered how much attention Ardern and her closest advisers had paid to the words of the veteran left-wing trade-union leader, Robert Reid. Barely 48 hours had passed since the Red Tide had ripped the infamous “handbrake” from NZ First’s hands, but Reid was already tweeting out a warning to the new Labour majority government:

“No one mentions that every government is a coalition between the elected governing party(s) and the senior bureaucrats.

“The bureaucracy acts as more of a handbrake than NZ First ever did

“But most “ruling” parties continue to let it dictate policy.”

What would happen, I asked myself, if the PM made it clear to her Cabinet colleagues that she was no longer willing to play it safe; that, having made promises to the New Zealand people, and been rewarded with an absolute majority, she was now absolutely determined to keep them?

The most obvious starting point for the PM would be the housing crisis. A major initiative here would not only boost the well-being of New Zealanders considerably, it would also make a huge impression on the level of child poverty. Killing two birds with one stone has always been an attractive political proposition. But, to be at all effective, such an effort would have to be on a scale unprecedented since the 1970s – entailing an eye-wateringly large amount of expenditure.

Alternatively, the PM may have decided to give effect to the Welfare Expert Advisory Group’s recommendations on social development – including a massive increase in core benefit levels. This, too, would provoke genuine horror in Treasury. Effectively eliminating child poverty at a stroke does not come cheap.

And, it is here, perhaps, that the rumour about a prime-ministerial resignation may have had its genesis. Faced with ever-higher levels of government borrowing, Treasury officials would undoubtedly have attempted to pressure the Finance Minister, Grant Robertson, into dissuading his friend and ally that what she was proposing was as irresponsible as it was unlikely to succeed.

In normal circumstances, this might have worked. But, from what I have discovered over the past 72 hours, these are not normal circumstances. Only last week, Robertson’s friend and mentor, Michael Cullen, a man stoically succumbing to terminal lung cancer, is reported to have told a select gathering of Labour Party notables that: “It is not enough simply to win – you have to DO something.” Aware of how determined the PM is to “do” as Cullen advises; seized also, as his friend is said to be, by intimations of mortality, Robertson, “the reluctant radical” seems ready, for once, to throw caution to the wind.

From all sides, now, comes word of the imminence of “something big” being announced. The Labour caucus is said to be both “nervous” and “excited”.

Writing in The Daily Blog, Martyn Bradbury (whose connections with the Labour caucus are numerous and strong) sums up the situation like this:

“Jacinda has taken the time over the Summer to decide being kind has to mean something, desperate rumours spread by Wellington bureaucratic elites that there is a split between Jacinda and Grant are designed to create a rift not report on one.”

If Prime Minister Ardern’s big policy gamble fails, then her resignation will, indeed, have to be handed to the Governor-General. But, everything I have learned over the last 72 hours convinces me that “Jacinda” is no longer content merely to win: she means to DO something.

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21 hours ago, rdytdy said:

We can only hope:

 

Rumours of a prime-ministerial resignation may be intended to head-off something considerably more dramatic on the policy front, Chris Trotter suggests
Chris Trotter's picture
22nd Mar 21, 7:28am
 
 
 
image001%20%287%29.jpg
Jacinda Ardern & Grant Robertson.

By Chris Trotter*

 

There are all kinds of political rumours, but they don’t get much bigger than: “The PM is about to resign.” When that rumour was relayed to me on Friday morning, my initial reaction was “Bullshit!” Wellington is a very intimate capital city, so the idea that such an important story could somehow be kept from the Parliamentary Press Gallery, struck me as fanciful. Were it not for the fact that my informant was “a usually reliable source”, I would have given the matter no more than a dismissive shake of the head. Instead, I decided to make some calls.

As I suspected, nothing remotely resembling a resignation rumour had been picked up by the Press Gallery. What I did hear, however, were concerns about “Jacinda”. The Prime Minister, I was told, was “out of sorts”, “morose”, “not her usual self”. Among female journalists, I discovered, there was much speculation about whether or not the PM was pregnant. Scuttlebutt, I thought to myself. Although, I had to concede, the PM’s sunny disposition has, of late, given every appearance of having fallen under a cloud. Even to the casual observer, Jacinda seems distracted.

It is doubtful whether her overall mood was uplifted by the latest poll results. Though Labour still hovers around its Election Night 50%, the TV1-Colmar Brunton survey showed Ardern falling a statistically significant 15 percentage points in the Preferred-Prime-Minister stakes.

 

It is likely that these latest numbers only accentuated the PM’s dissatisfaction with the way she and her government are being represented in the newspaper columns and across social media. This dissatisfaction turned out to be one of the most consistent themes of my Friday-morning soundings. The PM, it is alleged, has been stung by the sharp criticisms of her administration which have been growing in intensity since Labour’s landslide victory last October. At the heart of these critiques lie two inter-related questions: “Why the preternatural caution, Jacinda. What, or who, is stopping you?”

While New Zealanders understood the role played by Winston Peters and NZ First in reining-in the PM’s “transformational” aspirations (and were, accordingly, prepared to forgive Labour’s less-than-stellar record of achievement on the big issues of homelessness and child poverty) after 17 October 2020, that excuse was no longer available. Not when Labour, the Greens and Te Paati Maori between them command 77 seats in New Zealand’s 120-seat House of Representatives.

Labour’s caution and timidity were attributed (often none-too-kindly) to the party’s determination to hold on to the huge swag of former National Party voters who had defected to Labour in recognition of the PM’s outstanding handling of the Covid-19 Pandemic. Commentators mused that “Jacinda” was little more than a brand; and that, for all her talk about “the politics of kindness”, Ardern was just another party leader with one over-riding priority – winning the next election. Perhaps the unkindest cut of all came from one of Ardern’s most reliable supporters on social media. Martyn Bradbury, Editor of The Daily Blog. Playing on the left-wing swearword “Neoliberalism”, Bradbury described the PM as a media-savvy purveyor of “Neo-kindness”.

The message coming back to me throughout Friday was that these accusations had hurt. That the PM was feeling keenly the lack of faith in her bona fides – especially from those who are regarded as being (and who certainly see themselves as being) on the Left. I was told that over the summer Ardern’s determination to keep her promises to the homeless, the poor, and the planet had grown ever-stronger. That she refused to go down in history as an instinctively empathic crisis-manager. That someone who could pull off an electoral rout on the scale of 17 October required an altogether more substantial legacy. The word began to spread through Wellington’s labyrinthine corridors of power that “something big” could be expected on the policy front by the middle of the year.

Hearing this, I wondered how much attention Ardern and her closest advisers had paid to the words of the veteran left-wing trade-union leader, Robert Reid. Barely 48 hours had passed since the Red Tide had ripped the infamous “handbrake” from NZ First’s hands, but Reid was already tweeting out a warning to the new Labour majority government:

“No one mentions that every government is a coalition between the elected governing party(s) and the senior bureaucrats.

“The bureaucracy acts as more of a handbrake than NZ First ever did

“But most “ruling” parties continue to let it dictate policy.”

What would happen, I asked myself, if the PM made it clear to her Cabinet colleagues that she was no longer willing to play it safe; that, having made promises to the New Zealand people, and been rewarded with an absolute majority, she was now absolutely determined to keep them?

The most obvious starting point for the PM would be the housing crisis. A major initiative here would not only boost the well-being of New Zealanders considerably, it would also make a huge impression on the level of child poverty. Killing two birds with one stone has always been an attractive political proposition. But, to be at all effective, such an effort would have to be on a scale unprecedented since the 1970s – entailing an eye-wateringly large amount of expenditure.

Alternatively, the PM may have decided to give effect to the Welfare Expert Advisory Group’s recommendations on social development – including a massive increase in core benefit levels. This, too, would provoke genuine horror in Treasury. Effectively eliminating child poverty at a stroke does not come cheap.

And, it is here, perhaps, that the rumour about a prime-ministerial resignation may have had its genesis. Faced with ever-higher levels of government borrowing, Treasury officials would undoubtedly have attempted to pressure the Finance Minister, Grant Robertson, into dissuading his friend and ally that what she was proposing was as irresponsible as it was unlikely to succeed.

In normal circumstances, this might have worked. But, from what I have discovered over the past 72 hours, these are not normal circumstances. Only last week, Robertson’s friend and mentor, Michael Cullen, a man stoically succumbing to terminal lung cancer, is reported to have told a select gathering of Labour Party notables that: “It is not enough simply to win – you have to DO something.” Aware of how determined the PM is to “do” as Cullen advises; seized also, as his friend is said to be, by intimations of mortality, Robertson, “the reluctant radical” seems ready, for once, to throw caution to the wind.

From all sides, now, comes word of the imminence of “something big” being announced. The Labour caucus is said to be both “nervous” and “excited”.

Writing in The Daily Blog, Martyn Bradbury (whose connections with the Labour caucus are numerous and strong) sums up the situation like this:

“Jacinda has taken the time over the Summer to decide being kind has to mean something, desperate rumours spread by Wellington bureaucratic elites that there is a split between Jacinda and Grant are designed to create a rift not report on one.”

If Prime Minister Ardern’s big policy gamble fails, then her resignation will, indeed, have to be handed to the Governor-General. But, everything I have learned over the last 72 hours convinces me that “Jacinda” is no longer content merely to win: she means to DO something.

f Prime Minister Ardern’s big policy gamble fails, then her resignation will, indeed, have to be handed to the Governor-General. But, everything I have learned over the last 72 hours convinces me that “Jacinda” is no longer content merely to win: she means to DO something.

That WOULD BE A CHANGE....🥱  Let’s see if there is any real coherent strategy behind the facade....

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“THERE WILL NEVER BE A CAPITAL GAINS TAX UNDER MY GOVERNMENT.....”.   Remember that....?? 🤔

 

At present, any property other than an owner-occupied home that was bought between October 1, 2015, and March 28, 2018, and sold within two years, or purchased after March 29, 2018 and sold within five years, is subject to tax on its capital gains.

Now, any properties bought from March 27 will have to be held for 10 years to escape the tax.

The tax is applied at the marginal income tax rate of the owner and has been described by tax commentator Terry Baucher as a “de facto capital gains tax”.

It’s expected this will result in an extra $650 million a year for the Government.

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16 hours ago, Ohokaman said:

“THERE WILL NEVER BE A CAPITAL GAINS TAX UNDER MY GOVERNMENT.....”.   Remember that....?? 🤔

 

At present, any property other than an owner-occupied home that was bought between October 1, 2015, and March 28, 2018, and sold within two years, or purchased after March 29, 2018 and sold within five years, is subject to tax on its capital gains.

Now, any properties bought from March 27 will have to be held for 10 years to escape the tax.

The tax is applied at the marginal income tax rate of the owner and has been described by tax commentator Terry Baucher as a “de facto capital gains tax”.

It’s expected this will result in an extra $650 million a year for the Government.

Too bad if you are in a family or situation where they are all killed through an accident, murder etc and one has to sell one's home and pay Capital Gains tax.

Once again Miss Ardern and her Greens have not thought thought through the "Consequences" of her actions.

Oh and what about those trying to escape Family or other violence?
Do they to get penalized and have to keep the property or suffer further losses for reason's only Miss Ardern and her Finance Minister Grant Robertson can explain.

 

Suffer little children in POVERTY and PAIN in this PRISON ISLAND

 

 

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Come on folks, "State of Emergencies" powers can be and have been revoked as they revoked the one in place during War Time - read the history of that era of life in Papers Past NZ - it's all there and they were been bombed for goodness sake.

Did we shut down the (world's) economy for over 12 months when we had The Christchurch and Napier earthquakes?
When we have had floods?

Fires?  - we have an various alert level systems for fire risks to but they don't stop the economy operating, or people going about their lawful lives with FREEDOM.

Who has the courage to ask the easy questions of this current Government when they are going to Revoke  the State Of Emergency we are currently under?

Judith Collins you must ask this question as we the public have a Lawful Right to have answers and this nonsense carry on to cease.

It was only going to be "Two weeks", remember?

What a load of Communist boosheet that has been spun the last 12 months.

For those who may not have read it, read the 'Science Papers" in 25 ways of Ensuring Social Distancing written and endorsed by Miss Ardern, who followed screwball questionable UK SAGE - Scientific Advisory Group England "Scientists" whose backgrounds were not Professionally checked.''

 

Professor Neil Ferguson is on public record as stating they are following 'China" for advice and their actions in the UK despite the UK been a Commonwealth Country with quite different Laws

Politicians and "Scientists" must be held to account

There is no State of Emergency just like there's NO Pandemic for a Virus in New Zealand.

 

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1 hour ago, Ohokaman said:

Classic...

Someone take her phone off her, for goodness sake! It is all she does, takes photos of herself and talks to children online.
Completely and utterly useless waste of space

 

 

The problem for you Ohokaman is that Jacinda Ardern has little interest in you or your views. In her view of the world, you are a dinosaur and one of a generation who are on the way out the door. Those photo's she is posting are aimed at people 18 to 30, mostly young woman, who all get one vote, the same as you. And those Under 30's are looking at her photos and watching her pod casts and her evening Facebook talks etc etc, and they continue to like what they see.

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37 minutes ago, Uriah Heap said:

 

 

The problem for you Ohokaman is that Jacinda Ardern has little interest in you or your views. In her view of the world, you are a dinosaur and one of a generation who are on the way out the door. Those photo's she is posting are aimed at people 18 to 30, mostly young woman, who all get one vote, the same as you. And those Under 30's are looking at her photos and watching her pod casts and her evening Facebook talks etc etc, and they continue to like what they see.

Who is the Dinosaur again..? Her podcast was a disaster, you want to see the trending topics. Some are waking up, finally.

A093148D-681A-48EA-97D6-6A629128C2CC.jpeg

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11 hours ago, Uriah Heap said:

 

 

The problem for you Ohokaman is that Jacinda Ardern has little interest in you or your views. In her view of the world, you are a dinosaur and one of a generation who are on the way out the door. Those photo's she is posting are aimed at people 18 to 30, mostly young woman, who all get one vote, the same as you. And those Under 30's are looking at her photos and watching her pod casts and her evening Facebook talks etc etc, and they continue to like what they see.

Adern doesnt plan to be here for another term Heap,this is now a transformational government and by the time the next election rolls around even the Blind will see through this . Shes earned her seat in the UN 

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On 3/24/2021 at 10:41 PM, Gruff said:

Adern doesnt plan to be here for another term Heap,this is now a transformational government and by the time the next election rolls around even the Blind will see through this . Shes earned her seat in the UN 

Helen Clark & current President of United Nations have nicely tidied up that 'Conflict of Interest" for Miss Ardern to never ever be suitable for that role at UN, Besides, her leadership of her so called Team of 5 MILLION have nicely dragged her down with a series of serious failures of 'Rule of LAWS she is ultimately responsible for FAILING to comply with.

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Mike's Minute: Could this be the worst week for the government?

It's hard, as we sit here at the end of a draining week, to work out what was worse.

Was the tantalising prospect of a travel bubble with Australia, shattered by yet another vacuous, hyperbole filled sermon from the pulpit of bollocks and BS the biggest let down? Or was it the lie about the brightline test? Or was it the lie about the lie about the brightline test? Or was the government's insistence that Trevor Mallard is a good bloke they like to defend and the fact he's a bully isn't really an issue?

The fact all this unfolded in the one-year anniversary of level 4, just reminded us what a shambolic, disorganised, unprofessionally, ill planned for year this has been.

The upside is the bubble will come. It's close. It's late. Appallingly, economically ruinously late, but at least we'll have an actual real date soon.

I am convinced we are only here because of another lie. The one they told about Australia holding us up on reciprocation. It was busted by Scott Morrison the other week, thus sending our lot off on a mad scramble to try and save face and look like it wasn’t them all along holding us up.

That would have been bad enough, but then came the brightline and its adjustment. The next lie was laid bare, and you had to remind yourself it was only Tuesday.

Given Grant Robertson was caught on tape saying what he said, that was bad enough. But for the Prime Minister to then lie about the lie and say they stayed silent on the issue defied belief. And then Robertson tried to squirm his way out of a lie by saying it was simply being too definitive. I mean, honestly, did they workshop that bollocks without going beetroot red?

This all makes Mallard sadly less of a story than it deserves to be. Pre-Covid, we would have been aghast. Not just at Mallard obviously, but the fact his party can continue to support a bloke so lacking in morale fortitude.

He knew he'd done wrong, but doubled down on it publicly, hired lawyers at our expense, still didn't back down, only to settle having wrecked some man's reputation. And then it was exposed that you threatened him in the process, at a point where you knew you were wrong.

After all that to refuse to walk and have your party mates run defence for you, exposes not just Mallard as the morally vacuous dead weight he is, but also the Labour Party. Headed by the Prime Minister acting more like a mafia enforcer than a woman whose forged support based on the facade of kindness.

What a week. What do they say about fish rotting from the head?

 

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Labour Lacks Credibility and a Moral Compass

By JC

The word Government is a complete misnomer for the Labour Party. It’s akin to comparing Megan Markle with the truth. There is no relationship between the two. To use the word Government in its true sense when talking about Ardern and her mob of misfits is an abuse of the English language. They got re-elected on a platform of fear. Fear that they created. Their whole election strategy was based around the Covid pandemic. No policy of any substance was introduced, not that they had any if the truth be known. With a big fat fail in all major policy areas it was the life and death matter of Covid that told the story of the last election.

National didn’t help its chances for well-documented reasons but at least it took some good policy to the electorate. Unfortunately, the phone was off the hook. The Labour Party since being re-elected are no more credible than the first time around, perhaps even less so. The lies and lack of transparency continue. These things appear to be of no consequence to these people. Everything is just batted away with the line that circumstances have changed or in Grant Robertson’s case, he was “too definitive”.

Take housing as an example. Their policy, (most of it against Treasury advice), forced them to break promises. Again ideology-based, just like the bashing of the landlords, they are now bashing property investors. This is their speciality, the politics of envy, go after those who are doing well and penalise them with an envy tax. This is their way of trying to level the playing field, otherwise known as the redistribution of wealth to create a socialist nirvana by bringing the comrades down to the same level so that they are easier to control.

 

What is required in housing is to leave the market alone and sort out with Councils the means to free up more land. It is a supply and demand problem.

The Race Relations Commissioner Meng Foon insulted the Police by labelling them as racist. He should lose his job. They might have gone woke but they’re certainly not racist. If people of a certain ethnicity are committing most of the crime that’s hardly the fault of the Police. They are there to do a job which just happens to be arresting criminals. This is a problem Maori should be taking ownership of. Where is the Minister of Police, Poto Williams on Meng Foon’s outrageous statement? Is she speaking up on behalf of the Police? Her silence is appalling. The Police now know they have a Minister who won’t back them. This week in Question Time Kris Faafoi was answering questions on her behalf. She is out of her depth.

National MP Nicola Willis tackled the subject of the streets of Auckland and Wellington not being safe to walk at night. Instead of addressing the problem, the race card was again played. This time it was Marama Davidson, the person we pay vast amounts of lunch money to as it appears that’s all she does – eat her lunch. She took a leaf out of Meng Foon’s book and insulted Nicola Willis by calling her a racist. All the morons in Government fell just short of giving her a standing ovation. Absolutely disgraceful behaviour. This behaviour, plus not addressing questions properly and providing protection is all facilitated by the Speaker of the House.

 

Trevor Mallard. The worst Speaker ever by a million country miles. A disgrace to the position he holds, a disgrace to Parliament and the country as a whole. The fact he hasn’t fallen on his sword speaks volumes. The fact that Ardern hasn’t removed him also speaks volumes. I watched David Parker on the am show with Simon Bridges. I have to say that Bridges delivered the goods alongside the mealy-mouthed Parker. Parker enunciated the well worn pathetic excuse that he’s made a mistake, he’s apologised and there’s nothing more I can say.

So, in the case of Mallard, in the eyes of this Government it is perfectly acceptable to ruin a man’s life and career and an apology will suffice and the taxpayer foots the bill. 

Cartoon-The-BFD-SonovaMin-speakers-tie-6 Speaker’s tie. The BFD. Cartoon credit SonovaMin

In any other place of work, that sort of disgraceful bullying behaviour would be met with instant dismissal. The fact Ardern won’t act shows, as a human being that she is no better. This Government has all the characteristics of a Shakesperian Tragedy – a drama that leads to the downfall of the main character called the tragic hero. The plot builds to a catastrophe, or a disastrous final outcome, that usually involves the death of the hero and many others. The death in this case being the 2023 election.

 

It’s well past time to forget the fake kindness and the beaming Colgate smile. Two things are applicable here. Never judge a book by its cover and a leopard doesn’t change its spots. This Government lacks all credibility and is devoid of a moral compass. They barely seem to know right from wrong. They can’t implement good policy because ideology and envy rules. Anyone who has worked hard and made a success of their lives must have the fruits of their labours either penalised or taken away. Classic totalitarianism. All comrades must fall into line.

Not this one Jacinda. Not in a million years.

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Solid leadership shown by the Prime Minister in the past week is to be celebrated.

Pushing back against the harping on of the Right wing media, who bleat on for an Aussie Travel Bubble. PM supported by the silent majority of NZ's and shown to be the correct move, in light of Covid issues in Qland.

Boldly breaking promises, where required, to address the Housing crisis created by the former National Govt.

Retaining the services of that "No nonsense, tell it like it is", Speaker of the House Mallard. We could do with more Members of Parliament like him.

Good effort Prime Minister. Keep up the good work.

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9 minutes ago, Uriah Heap said:

Solid leadership shown by the Prime Minister in the past week is to be celebrated.

Pushing back against the harping on of the Right wing media, who bleat on for an Aussie Travel Bubble. PM supported by the silent majority of NZ's and shown to be the correct move, in light of Covid issues in Qland.

Boldly breaking promises, where required, to address the Housing crisis created by the former National Govt.

Retaining the services of that "No nonsense, tell it like it is", Speaker of the House Mallard. We could do with more Members of Parliament like him.

Good effort Prime Minister. Keep up the good work.

You are obviously on the Public Tit Heap, not compromised financially by the marxist behaviour!

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On 3/29/2021 at 1:25 PM, Uriah Heap said:

Solid leadership shown by the Prime Minister in the past week is to be celebrated.

Pushing back against the harping on of the Right wing media, who bleat on for an Aussie Travel Bubble. PM supported by the silent majority of NZ's and shown to be the correct move, in light of Covid issues in Qland.

Boldly breaking promises, where required, to address the Housing crisis created by the former National Govt.

Retaining the services of that "No nonsense, tell it like it is", Speaker of the House Mallard. We could do with more Members of Parliament like him.

Good effort Prime Minister. Keep up the good work.

Are You getting The Jab Heapy ?

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1 hour ago, Gruff said:

Are You getting The Jab Heapy ?

 

Absolutely! Right at this minute I am waiting patiently in line, sleeve rolled up, waiting for Dr Bloomfield to call my name. It might take a while, but you'll hear no complaining from me, because I know those in charge have got it all under control. 🙂

 

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