scooby3051

DEAN MCKENZIE RITA QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS

51 posts in this topic

Hi everyone Dean Mckenzie RITA Chairman, has offered to come on RaceCafe exclusively to answer relevant questions on a date to be agreed between Dean and I after the 25th of September.

Please submit relevant questions below and we will do our best to answer all of them.

This is a great opportunity to get to the head of RITA and I am sure many of you have good questions you can submit.

Please do not be rude or offensive as it is a great place for interaction to start and for some good honest and open discussions to take place, and we appreciate Dean taking the time to do this.

All questions need to be submitted here before the 25th, and then once we decide the format to answer them we will get as many people from RaceCafe involved in the discussions as possible.

We are trying to have a Live session to answer the questions that are submitted which will be a first for RaceCafe.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can RITA create a structure that incentivises Racing Clubs to promote Racedays and thus wagering and participation on course?

  1. Nerula  

 

RITA does not directly influence the structure that incentivises racing clubs to promote race days. Racing Clubs and their on-course activities are primarily funded via their own governing bodies (codes) funding policies but the TAB (presently RITA) also obviously plays its part in promoting race daysin a general sense. 

 

Each of the codes operates their own individual funding policy to directly reward their clubs for on-course wagering, so in other words each code has profit distributed to it from RITA and they decide how best to allocate that to fund their own racing clubs. In the post Messara world, the TAB’s focus will be more centred on maximising commercial returns for the industry as a whole.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

why not make te aroha the mega centre racecourse in the area.....the space ,the infrastructure is already there....it is perfectly placed for all to travel to...spend some money on the track ,build a boutique grandstand...build a racetrack that people look forward to going to on a regular basis....[especially considering ellerslie closes down for 4 months ,which is absolutely  ridiculous ]

  1. Voice of reason  

 

We agree Te Aroha is a wonderful venue but RITA has limited direct connection with individual venues themselves from a strategic sense, indeed our involvement is limited primarily to being a member of the “Future Venue Plan (FVP)” group. 

 

This group of code and RITA representatives has been assembled to drive the various venue related initiatives that make up the Messara report. Ultimately the codes (NZTR, HRNZ, GRNZ) are responsible for developing the FVP for their respective sports and RITA’s involvement has been around attempting to put together, in the second Bill, the framework to deal with the issues that naturally flow out of this process, ensuring evaluation of a venue is clear and as objective as possible, and a dispute resolution process is available for the industry should club and code differ on the makeup of a FVP decision. We await government decision in this space for possible inclusion in the second bill. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

if i have a $50  bet and manage to win $1200 how is that money laundering ...if i placed a bet of $5,000 then sure ask the question...this stupid rule has nothing to do with someone who manages to jag a win ...why should have to prove to your organisation who i am...change this invasive rule to those placing bets in large amounts..

  1. Voice of reason

 

We 100% agree with your comments. This “rule” resulted from government Anti-Money Laundering (AML) changes that came into effect on 1 August and not from TAB policy or the like. We lobbied hard for the limit to be higher - ideally more closely aligned with Australia however we weren’t successful at the time. We can assure you that we are actively working with the Ministers Office and also the Department of Internal Affairs, who oversee these matters, to encourage change. In the interim, it’s really important we’re very clear with punters about what is required, particularly as we come up to the Spring Carnival, so we’ll be working hard to get the message out. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With turnover declining what will RITA  do about sourcing other revenue streams? E.g. Stallion levies and levies on exported horses.

  1. Gubellini

You are 100% correct that alternative revenue streams are the key for us to grow the business, however the examples you have used are appropriate for the code governing bodies (NZTR,HRNZ, GRNZ) than RITA. My understanding is there are existing levies in place with the codes akin to the examples you have used. As far as RITA goes the reform process underway is the single greatest opportunity the industry has had to diversify and grow its revenue streams. In the first bill passed in June, we secured the repeal of the betting levy over the next three years, passed necessary legislation to establish Betting Information Use Charges (BIUC) and Point of Consumption (POC) and also widened the scope of betting on sport, in certain circumstances, where a particular sport is not represented in NZ by a national sporting organisation (NSO). RITA has also made strong submissions that a suite of new wagering products be included in the second bill, currently being considered by government, including virtual racing, in-race betting and a number of others. All these give the industry new opportunities to grow revenue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question for Dean McKenzie;

Will you take steps to lift the $1000 threshold on collecting winnings on course?

Explanation;  I saw a bloke who had travelled to be on course and he  put $100 on his mate's horse paying $9.20.  The horse's price drifted to $10.90 and IT WON!  Everybody said shout, but the punter couldn't as he had lost his driving licence and could not prove his identity.  It was embarrassing to be associated, as an unpaid volunteer, of the racing club that hosted that race meeting.

  1. Tauhei Notts  

 

Per  above

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Many of the problems facing NZ racing are systemic worldwide.

Are you cooperating with other jurisdictions on joint initiatives and if so are there any positives from that?

  1. Slam Dunk  

 

I agree many problems facing the racing industry in New Zealand are systematic worldwide and there is much we can learn from what is happening in other jurisdictions, indeed I understand the codes are very active in this space. RITA itself is presently focused on delivering the Ministers reform programme, with the second bill hopefully in the house before Christmas and has its riding/driving instructions outlined in a “Letter of Expectation” from the Minister which sets out our priorities. This is a public document and can be found on the Department of Internal Affairs website but it focuses on us transitioning the industry from its present state to a more sustainable, revitalised future state. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1) For 6+ months a year NZ racing is a very poor betting product, owing to the state of racing surfaces. Ellerslie was an absolute disgrace on Saturday. Stakes are intrinsically linked to turnover, so what is RITA 's plan re race tracks?

 

2) Domestic turnover is stagnant, if not offering limited growth potential. Australia is a massive growth market, yet our TAB website is blocked (self-imposed by NZ TAB). Is anything been done to rectify this issue? 

 

3) Will anyone ever be held accountable for the $80mill(?) TAB website debacle? 

 

  1. Bezerk 

 

 

(1)  RITA is actively involved with the codes developing a “Future Venue Plan (FVP)” which will act as a blueprint to take industry forward, with investmentin infrastructureand facilities a key component. This group of code and RITA representatives has been assembled to drive the various venue related initiatives that make up the Messara report. Ultimately the codes (NZTR, HRNZ, GRNZ) are responsible for developing the FVP for their respective sports and RITA’s involvement has been around attempting to put together, in the second bill, the framework to deal with the issues that naturally flow out of this process, ensuring evaluation of a venue is clear and as objective as possible, and a dispute resolution process is available for the industry should club and code differ on the makeup of a FVP decision. We await government decision in this space for possible inclusion in the second bill. 

(2)  Regrettably the limitations on punters from Australia using the TAB website or mobile app occured because of a decision made by the Federal Government in Australia. The Australian Government's interactive Gambling Amendment Act stops people in Australia betting with overseas bookmakers who don't have a licence in Australia and that includes  the TAB. Unfortunately there’s no sign of this changing.

(3)  The Industry has made a significant investment in our new website and RITA remains focused on getting on with developing it by listening to our customers and improving its performance on a daily basis. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My question would be, what is happening about that huge albatross around the industries neck, the NZ Racing Authority, are cuts going to be made or will we continue pouring money into what is a bureaucratic abyss

  1. Stables 

 

I can assure you that RITA is extremely focused on driving any organisational efficiency that may be available. The Minister has made it very clear in his Letter of Expectation that we should look for efficiency gains in RITA operations without compromising organisational capability, minimise transitional costs and ensure the transfer of functions to the codes does not result in an overall increase in cost to the industry. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dear Dean

Clearly you have to generate substantially more revenue, can you help me understand, in one sentence, how you intend to do that ?

Your next step will be to reduce costs, same deal, in one sentence please explain your strategy there ?

Lastly, as an industry we seem to struggle with reliable information systems to assist punters. If follows that good data encourages informed decisions and that in turn increases revenue. 

I understand it’s more of a code thing but is there any chance RITA could create reliable and useful historical footage and accompanying statistical information to make the average punters job quicker, easier, and more useful ?

Two micro examples of this “enhanced information” service might be something as simple as weighing every horse as it leaves the saddling barn, then advising weight fluctuations, and enabling a one touch option to store your “favoured” runners from the NZTR video resources, linked to the TAB “ favorites option” on their site, just so you actually get a reminder and thus know when something you fancy is running.

Thanks Dean, and good fucking luck because you’re going to need it !!

  1. Poundforpound 

 

You are correct, we have to drive more revenue as our number one priority, we won’t ‘save ourselves to success’, so to speak. The various revenue streams outlined in the final MAC (Ministerial Advisory Committee) report to the Minister is the best summary of these. The combination of those already passed in the first bill (betting levy repeal, BIUC, POC etc.) and the balance that will hopefully be included in the second bill will produce significant new revenue streams for the industry. In race betting, spread betting, betting exchange options, fantasy betting, virtual racing, novelty betting etc. are all examples of products that could contribute to these new revenue streams should the Industry have the approval mechanism available to it to introduce these (and other new products in the future). 

 

With regards to costs, we are examining these on an organisational wide basis and are committed to driving any efficiency that may exist. This is an on-going process and won’t finish at any particular time. 

 

With regards your suggestions around “good data”, I can’t make any immediate promises in that regard but agree it is essential that theindustry provides our customers with the best experience possible and it would be fair to say at the moment we have not yet reached that mark. We do need to work more closely with the codes to provide our customers with ready access to the data they demand, in aformat that makes it easy to consume. I know that answer won’t specifically have you doing cart wheels but put simply we do need to lift our game in this space.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1. What is the forecasted (projected) total cost of running NZ Racing for the next three years?                                

2. Are there any plans to be put in place for a “real” reduction in running costs over this period?                            

3. If there is a planned reduction in running costs, what is it in percentage terms and what does that translate into real $ savings over this period?                                                        

4. If the answer to Q2 is a YES, what plans are in place for the future use of the savings? (Eg, debt reduction, improved infrastructure etc).                  

5. If the answer to Q2 is NO, can you give an explanation as to why you don’t believe it’s neither necessary nor beneficial?  

                   

  1.  Trump                            

 

(1) RITA doesn’t have visibility of the Code’s future costs but if we look at their most recent reports we know NZTR operating expenses were in the region of $9m, HRNZ approximately $4m and $5m for GRNZ. For the same period, the former NZRB’s operating expenses were $144m, with the total at $162m. I can’t speak for the Codes but I expect RITA’s expenses to be less on a consolidated basis. 

 

(2) There is an absolute commitment from the RITA board to achieve real reductions in running costs going forward, as outlined by the Minister in his Letter of Expectation.

 

(3) We have not focused on a targeted % number at this point but instead have a strategy of examining all parts of the business to ensure any available savings, that doesn'tcompromise performance, can be made and drop to the bottom line. 

 

(4) Given the fact the industry has been living beyond its means the last couple of years, our first focus has been to at least maintain industry funding (per the Ministers Letter of Expectation) and then look to pass the new revenue streams created through the reform process and relevant cost savings onto the codes once this base is secure. Debt repayment is most definitely something that also needs to be considered in the short to medium term, obviously balanced against the need to kick start the industry through getting these funds flowing back to stakeholders, a demanding balance to strike. 

                   

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"It would seem that the NZTR is a quasi fiefdom where nominations, and therefore appointments to the board, are controlled by an ongoing legacy. Does RITA have the ability to review and execute a completely different NZTR board nomination and appointment model?"

  1. Berri 

 

Without commenting on any one particular code governance model, the pursuit of best practice governance has been covered in the second bill, which the government are presently considering. Building on the direction contained in the Messara review, it is obviously essential that wehave the best possible people in key industry governance positions. We await feedback from the government. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have RITA commissioned an independent review of the new betting platform including the cost so far and how much work is required to get it to a satisfactory state.

  1. Patiti 

 

RITA have not specifically commissioned a review of the new betting platform costs, although this matter was covered in the normal annual audit conducted by PWC and in the section 14 Audit undertaken by Grant Thornton. As you will be aware the platform was commissioned at the beginning of the year so the organisations focus is now making it the best it can be and ensuring we quickly address any concerns our customers may have as to its on-going operation. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question:

Is it considered more economical and efficient to run lots of meetings with 6 or 7 races and small fields rather than fewer meetings but with ten races? For instance Tauranga 11 Sept, 6 races, 45 horses; Taranaki 5 September 7 races, 51 horses; Pukekohe 4 Sept 7 races, 62 horses.. Logic would indicate that it would be better to have one meeting with ten races and 100 odd horses, rather than two meetings with 13 races and 90 odd horses between them. $30,000 savings in stakes to start with and surely some savings in fixed costs, not to mention savings in trainers and jockeys travel. Virtually all of the horses from a CD midweek meeting could be accommodated by a ten race card on a Saturday at certain times of the year.

Is it considered that the current allocation of race-dates matches the regional spread of horses?  Does Rita note those regions that regularly have numerous ballotted and eliminated horses, and those regions that struggle to fill fields?

Does Rita still consider that an all-weather track is a really good idea for the SI, and a great use of industry funds, despite the fact there are already several tracks in the SI that currently provide reasonable surfaces all winter?

Has Rita noticed that Riccarton still doesn't have a public grandstand and does Rita think this is a good look? And does Rita think it should get involved in this situation?

That's probably enough for now.

  1. We’re Doomed 

 

There are many different variables that go into the creation of the dates calendar itself and then also the programming of races etc. within that framework. The outcome of the dates process is coordinatedby RITA but in effect the matters you have raised are for the most part the domain of the code body (NZTR in your case) and their regional programming committees which seek to optimise horse participation and thereby maximising industry revenue etc. History would show this is a very complex process and when you mix in other variables like weather, abandonments etc. it is always difficult to get this 100% right all the time. 

 

The Messara Review recommended the establishment of three synthetic tracks at Cambridge, Awapuni and Riccarton. Our understanding is that NZTR are still looking to progress these projects and RITA has certainly committed funds to the Cambridge option. Ultimately it is NZTR’s decision to progress the business case for each venue and RITA has yet to be formally approached with regards Awapuni and Riccarton. I am sure NZTR would have considered the points you have raised in its overall analysis of the Riccarton business case.  

 

Being a member at Riccarton I am aware that the public grandstand is currently out of commission but it is not something we are currently involved with. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question for Dean

 

There are various platforms available in the communication world today. But the TAB have closed the door on the phone punters and the small bettors that had an interest, and also closed the various TAB sites and agencies around the country, therefore leading to the closure of the 4 to 5 hours of churn betting that such platforms generated.

Can we expect to see a return of phone betting and less closures of TAB outlets to facilitate the 20% of betting that was lost as a result of such closures? The average age of a racing bettor is increasing and that age is not a reflection of the latest communication platforms available in NZ.

There could be an increase of up to 10% betting available if they understand markets and customers!!

John

  1. John Clydesdale 

 

The decision to move away from phone betting was taken in 2016. Like other industries, TAB customers were increasingly shifting online. At the time,  more than 70% of customers over 65 were using online channels and very few new customers were using the Phonebet service. The TAB has continued to provide touchtone betting and a phone service for medically restricted customers. As we look to increase distributions to industry we have to be very conscious of our spend as well as what our customers want. Returning to phonebet is not an investment we are looking to make.

 

The retail network remains a very important part of the TAB offering . However, given the ongoing migration of customers to other channels, we are constantly reviewing our network to ensure it’s fit for purpose and commercially viable. We have more than 500 TAB outlets around the country and we continue to invest in our branches to improve the customer experience.But it’s also a very costly part of our business so we need to continue to be mindful of driving efficiencies where we can, including through our online offering.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One of the things the industry desperately needs is an information processing system (IPS) that has the ability to provide customers/ users the ability to interrogate any information about any horse in an intuitive and habitual manner using any form of technology that is available. The current NZTR site is a very poor attempt at doing this.

"Is the RITA going to develop this IPS that can also provide a service to all the beneficiaries of RITA's initiatives, or is RITA going to rely on the NZTR and the other beneficiaries to produce their own? Could this be a priority once the legislation is in place?"

  1. Berri - 

 

 

As the wagering operator, TAB needs access to the best information possible to drive wagering. Improving the quality of our form is an area of focus, making sure customers have all the information they require (video, trials, sectional information, speed maps etc) to help place a bet is important and will be a priority over the next 12 months

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the opportunity Dean.

 
Given RITA's mandate is to implement the Messara Report, can you update progress and / or current thinking on the following please :
 
1. Increasing revenue is obviously a prime objective for all stakeholders in NZ. Changes to the Racing Act 2003 will be required before many of the recommendations can proceed....the main one being the reduction in courses from 48 to 28 and the vesting in NZTR of the ownership of freehold racecourse land and other net assets of Race Clubs.
Given the opposition to date to these recommendations ( Avondale a prime example ), the the likelihood of lengthy legal battles, and the general distrust of the Industry in the capacity of NZTR to effectively manage these assets given their record to date, are these still seriously considered viable options ?
 
2. The building of three synthetic racing and training tracks over the next 3 years at Cambridge, Awapuni and Riccarton will require an investment of some $190m and will depend largely on the changes above.
We understand the Cambridge development is proceeding with PWC currently undertaking a feasibility study while resource consents are obtained.
What expert opinion on these type of tracks has been obtained and included in the decision making process, given that soil bases are different in NZ and the "one size fits all" approach is not necessarily the right one....?
Are Awapuni and Riccarton still regarded as the other "obvious" sites ??
 
3. Increasing stakes is vital for the NZ Racing Industry to survive going forward and the recommendation to introduce a simplified 3 Tier structure for New Zealand thoroughbred racing and a Prizemoney Matrix that will provide for about $110 million of prizemoney (up from $53.7 million in 2016/17 and an estimated $59.4 million in 2017/18.) is a commendable approach. Problem is we have heard the same thing for years from a succession of "Industry leaders" and where are we ? Murray Baker clearly has reservations...!
How confident are you this can be achieved ??
 
4. The other side of the increasing revenue equation is controlling costs.
The Minister has requested a Performance and Efficiency Audit of NZRB Operating costs which appear to most to have got completely out of hand.
When are we likely to see this report ?
 
Cheers
  1. Ohokaman

 

(1)   The venue issue is one that has hovered around New Zealand racing for generations so we are under no illusion that there is no magic wand, so to speak, that we can wave to solve some of the issues you have alluded to. What we have attempted to do in the development of the second bill is put forward an evaluation and dispute resolution framework that the industry can potentially use to drive some reform in this area. Driven on the back of the Future Venue Plan process, which is an industry wide initiative, this framework can hopefully help provide a clearer pathway as to why the industry may believe a venue is now not required for racing (by measuring certain agreed criteria) and if after going through this evaluation process there is disagreement between code and club, that there is a formal dispute resolution process the industry can work through to get to an end point. We await direction from the government on the considerable on-going work that has been done in this area. 

 

(2)   The Messara Review recommended three synthetic racing and training tracks be constructed at Cambridge, Awapuni and Riccarton. I can see how you have read from the Messara Review that the cost of that is $190m, given how it was written, but that included his estimated cost of upgrading the racing and facilities infrastructure at all the remaining tracks. Although I am not privy to any actual numbers, the approximate cost of the three synthetic racing and training tracks is probably more in the $35m to $45m range I would have thought. NZTR, along with the Cambridge Jockey Club, are driving the Cambridge project and my understanding is there has been extensive involvement of track specialists in this process. You are also correct that it would be prudent for the industry to bed down the Cambridge project prior to moving further down the synthetic track pathway but ultimately that is the decision of NZTR. 

 

(3)   You are right, again, that the success or otherwise of the reform programme will predominantly be measured on what increases in prizemoney eventuate. Ultimately how prizemoney is structured/paid is up to the codes and our job at RITA is ensure the reform programme is successfully implemented and the commercial focus of the TAB is enhanced to ensure revenue to the codes (to pay prize money) is maximised. The reality is there is no single silver bullet that will make this all happen, rather a collection of initiatives that together will drive these outcomes. As I type this reply, we are probably around 60% through the reform programme and await clarification of some crucial aspects over the next month or so to give us a clearer guide as to where we are going. Provided these dominos fall in the right order, the industry can be confident that we are better placed than we have ever been to deliver a financially sustainable, revitalised future. 

 

(4)   Good question. We have just reviewed this document at our last board meeting on September 25 and this should make its way through the formal process over the next month. You can be assured however that there is a strong desire by RITA to manage its business in the most efficient way possible. 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, weasel57 said:

Dean

1 Why is John Allen still running RITA, formerly NZRB?

2 Why is the bureaucratic, slow-moving DIA handling the crucial and urgent matter of creating revenue streams from racefields legislation and POC tax?

Reference to Q1: 

I am clearly a legend in my own Mustelid lunchbox ...one question from me and the man in question is on his bike within hours. LOL

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you seriously considering appointing another CEO? 

If so at what salary?

Why don’t you take the position yourself?

  1. Insider 

 

We will be advertising for a new Chief Executive in the very near future to take us through the remainder of the transition period and beyond.   I understand salary levels are always something of interest to the industry but ultimately that would be negotiated with the successful applicant and reported in RITA’s annual financial statements as required. My own personal commitments wouldn’t allow me to apply for the role. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Clearly something needs to be done to increase turnover and revenue.  One way to increase turnover would be to require the TAB to accept bets from all customers to lose say $3,000 per bet (similar to Australian minimum bet rules).  I appreciate that increased turnover doesn't guarantee increased revenue, but my understanding from the Australian states where minimum bet rules have been introduced, is that it has increased revenue to the industry.

Furthermore, most restricted punters have had these restrictions in place from when the old TAB platform was in operation.  The main reason given in the past for most restrictions was that punters were able to beat the TAB when fixed odds prices changed, due to the TAB having to manually set odds.  The new TAB fixed odds platform has eliminated this issue so there should be no reason for many of the restrictions.

So my question is - why don't you require the TAB to accept fixed odds bets from all customers to lose $3,000 per bet to see if this would have a beneficial impact on revenue?  This could be implemented over night and monitored closely to see what impact it had on turnover (which would certainly increase) but more importantly revenue.

  1. Leicthin 

 

The TAB’s approach is in line with standard bookmaking practices and RITA does impose betting restrictions on a small number of customers, whilst we don't have a minimum ‘bet to lose amount’, by international standards are limits are generous, particularly on race day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How much income does a "typical" $10,000 race generate? I get the impression that it must lose money, hence the general reluctance to split fields, even if there are often enough horses to give a club a 9th or 10th race with 14 starters. And if a "typical" $10,000 race with a full field loses money how can the industry afford the numerous rating 82 races in the North, such as this weekend at Pukekohe, that go around with only 5 or 6 starters for a stake of $30,000?

  1. We’re doomed 

It’s difficult to determine a ‘typical’ race. If we look at last Sunday’s racing at Te Aroha, as an example, there was $750k turnover on the day (all races) with a gross betting margin of 8%, but obviously the $$ can vary significantly depending on field sizes, conditions, quality of products etc.

 

Ultimately the decision to allocate prize money, split races etc. is one taken by the Codes themselves when programming and there are many variables that go into that decision being made. RITA’s focus is to increase distributions to the codes so overall prize money can be raised. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Question for Dean: 

Why are the TAB racing turnover figures not publicly available to the extent that they once were (full disclosure on a weekly basis), when the majority of the racing public have an interest in them? Are they really that embarrassing they need to be hidden? 

Thanks in advance. 

  1. Rusty 

 

Historically in the pure tote only years, turnover was the number one measure of revenue, given the standard deductions made in the various bet types. As customer preferences have shifted more to fixed odds, the number one measure for revenue is now gross betting revenue or in other words what margin or profit we are making when we sell a bet. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

After looking at race dates for the current season, is there a particular reasoning behind the placement of mid-week meetings given most race-goers are better able to attend weekend meetings?

What are his thoughts on maybe even a couple of months shutdown during the year for the local product as there are periods of the year when trainers, jockeys and owners must surely bleed money on loss making meetings?

My humble contribution.....

 

  1. Gerrymir 

The dates calendar for the current season contains a similar number and flow of midweek meetings to prior years, which has seemed to work well for the codes. 

 

There are a number of drivers that the Dates Committee look at with a particular focus on optimising betting revenue from the meetings. There are more than 1,000 meetings every year to schedule, with the majority of the most popular meetings being held on the weekend. The scheduling is largely driven by the Codes but it is also consulted with the industry on. Your idea of a “shutdown” for a couple of months could be something worth investigating further.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you going to review the performance of Andy Kydd and the presentation of racing on Trackside? Are we also going to see a review the presenters?

  1. Berri 

It wouldn’t be appropriate to publicly discuss the performance of any individual RITA employee. The Trackside team does appreciate feedback from viewers and continues to look at improvements it can make, including bringing on new presenters, which is has done recently.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Under Estimated loss of revenue : Are you going to bring forward the return of free to air TV racing channel ?  (even if only for NZ racing)

Also the return of hard copy Race books to other retail outlets beside the TAB stores.       As this topic is for question only I have made it straight to the point,however I can offer 1st hand experiences of how the lack of the above are costing our game thousands of dollars  

       

  1. 47 South 

The TAB have driven a number of innovations in this space with racing now being available on Spark Sport as well as on SKY.'s Trackside. There are active conversations underway to look at having some racing content available on free to air television and also through online media. RITA has been actively working over recent months to support a new punting magazine following the Informant closing, We are hopeful of being able to confirm a new publication in the next month or so.

        

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now