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TRENTHAM TRACK

33 posts in this topic

36 minutes ago, GOM said:

Is there such a thing as de-oxegenated water? does that make it H2?

I believe rainwater - ie: from the sky brings trace amounts of nitrogen with it, hence in a frozen form (snow) it is regarded as the poor mans fertilizer.

 

With regard to Leggy's thread - I have said here before that 20mm irrigation applied over 24 hours does not have the same effect as 20mm applied over 3 hours 

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27 minutes ago, von Smallhaussen said:

I believe rainwater - ie: from the sky brings trace amounts of nitrogen with it, hence in a frozen form (snow) it is regarded as the poor mans fertilizer.

Rainwater also contains dissolved oxygen.

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3 hours ago, Blue said:

I certainly don't know any of the soil science Leggy and am happy to admit parts of my tome may be a little simplistic and some generalisation but I think it's basically correct as far as it goes. If, as you say " Other jurisdictions manage to use irrigation to good effect on racecourses without the latter results, " what are our guys doing wrong that means we can't ever race on a fast track in summer and a couple of inches of natural rainfall results in abandonments?

I am no grass/turf expert but it seems obvious what's going to happen if you sprinkle water on , perhaps "other Jurisdiction's" Irrigate in larger volumes well before a race meeting getting it to soak in making roots go deeper.

We always used to race on hard and fast tracks 20 years ago no problem  , if you got a bit of rain in the last 24/48 hours because there was always a good root structure the water could get away through the soil because it was fractured thanks to a good deep root system, everything held together , No real issues?   but  now with irrigated tracks you have grass roots only going horizontal you are left with a hard pan just under the surface that moisture cant get through therefore it gives you the " Mat on the Varnished floor syndrome" very slippery?? 

.

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10 hours ago, GOM said:

Leggy, that article is about dosing water with peroxide. How does that happen with rain?

Read the article again. Rainwater is naturally well oxygenated:

The typical origins of water used on crops is rainwater - high in O2 (unless stored for too long in a tank), ground water – oxygen deprived, (reverse) Osmosis water – oxygen deprived, and town water which is purposefully oxygen poor to prevent oxidation of the water delivery system. In some cases river/canal/lake water is used and those waters are generally well oxygenated unless affected by eutrophication.

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2 hours ago, Leggy said:

Read the article again. Rainwater is naturally well oxygenated:

The typical origins of water used on crops is rainwater - high in O2 (unless stored for too long in a tank), ground water – oxygen deprived, (reverse) Osmosis water – oxygen deprived, and town water which is purposefully oxygen poor to prevent oxidation of the water delivery system. In some cases river/canal/lake water is used and those waters are generally well oxygenated unless affected by eutrophication.

Fair enough Leggy, I know 02 is soluble in H20 but thought that would produce H202 which is hydrogen peroxide. As you have shown when H202 is degraded it releases O2 so you would think the opposite would happen. Must be like chicken soup where the salt etc is in the soup but doesn't alter the chemical makeup of the water.

Now back on topic. I think I attended nearly every meeting at Trentham between 1960 and 1980 and saw some hugely heavy tracks then that were easily as bad as todays or even worse

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But no likelihood of pulling the pin GOM, and in some of the winter meetings they would be Saturday, Wednesday, Saturday, hurdles and steeples all on the course proper prior to the figure 8 course.

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