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Race Protests

3 posts in this topic

Could someone please explain the rules around race protests.

What is the criteria that promotes or demotes a horse for interference?

I think the rules changed some time ago.

For example yesterday at Rotorua R3 3rd placed Marzubet protested against 1st and 2nd

Marzubet was beaten hd,ns after being hampered by he winner at the 250m mark.

MARBUZET (R Elliot) – Crowded passing the 250 metres between WEAPONRY (O Bosson) which shifted in slightly and SHE’S A GODDESS (J Bayliss) which shifted out looking to obtain clear running with MARBUZET then having to shift out to obtain clear running. Riders O Bosson and J Bayliss were reprimanded by Stewards and advised to exercise greater care in a similar circumstance. Following the race the connections of the third placed horse MARBUZET lodged a protest against the first placed horse WEAPONRY and the second placed horse SHE’S A GODDESS alleging interference entering the final straight. After hearing submissions the Judicial Committee dismissed the protest.

Basically cost him a length and beaten a head or is that not relevant now.

 

Also .....are jockey's aware of the 4 horses that are involved in H2H betting?

Are they obliged to ride them out to the finish?....I notice some don't.

Thanks in advance

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I found this.

What does this mean??

The new rule will mean connections of a horse protesting a race result will have to convince a judicial committee that their horse would have finished ahead of the horse who caused the interference.

Does it mean if your horse is an outsider against a fav you have no hope?

I say racing needs a bunker system. Connections should have zero say.

Think that is the case in US.

 

New Zealand gallops will have a new protest rule from July 1 2008

The new rule will mean connections of a horse protesting a race result will have to convince a judicial committee that their horse would have finished ahead of the horse who caused the interference.

This will align New Zealand with Australian protest rules.

"This will take out much of the discretionary element of protest decisions and it will avoid the anomalous situation where a winning horse is relegated several places behind one which was clearly not going to beat it home in the race," New Zealand Thoroughbred Racing chief executive Paul Bittar said today.

There is also a change to the criteria for a protest.

A protest can now be lodged by the connections of a horse that finished or had the potential to finish in a stakes bearing position, not just a dividend bearing position.

Bittar said NZTR would work with the Judicial Control Authority to ensure there were stiffer fines and suspensions for interference, in the hope jockeys did not take a "win at all costs" approach in major races.

"Crucially this rule aligns New Zealand with our commingling partners and provides consistency for punters on both sides of the Tasman in the treatment of horses involved in a protest situation. The value and importance of this element cannot be underestimated," he said.

The change comes after consultation within the racing industry. The current rule has caused much angst in the racing community, particularly when minor interference by a winner has resulted in it being relegated.

One of the most controversial in recent years was when Viennetta was relegated from first to third in the $120,000 New Zealand Thoroughbred Breeders' Stakes at Te Aroha in 2006.

In the home straight she caused minor interference to Salsa who was third across the line before Viennetta won easily. Many thought the judicial committee should have exercised its right not to change placings because it was a bigger injustice to relegate Viennetta than promote Salsa from third to second.

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