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Dyna Weslyn

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Wow!  Amazing run tonight, half a length off the track record at her 6th start. What are the top 5 fastest run homes at addington over the 520? Would have to be close. Wish NZGRA would start giving us split records at the main tracks atleast. 

 

Xylia Allen is probably my favourite dog ever, awesome to see a daughter of her in NZ with an amazing future over the 600+!

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Run-home times obviously were never available before sectional timing and no record was ever kept of these after it did became available. 

However, here the fastest of the completed 520m races which may be of interest.

Johnny Midnight C1 record 29.84   30/7/8

Miss Koonawarra C2 and track record  29.78   30/5/8

Winsome Ashley C3 record 29.83   30/11/7

Opawa Shackley C4 record  29.86   4/2/16

Sergio ex-C5 record 29.83   28/10/10

Tom Tee C5 record  29.82  5/4/18

Oh So Nitro won a C0 in 29.98 on 6/4/18 but he was on a double nom and was classified as C1. The C0 record is Opawa O'Grady 30.02  18/12/15.

I don't have all my books now but others may be able to add a few more sub 30 seconds. From memory, Tom Tee has broken that barrier at least 5 times and possibly the most by any greyhound over the 520m at Addington.

Others may be able to come up with some of the best run-home times. Curiously enough, Speed Ticket comes to mind.

 

 

 

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Not sure why they do that virtual.It was exciting to see the track record equaled on the timer! then dissapointing to see point 3 added to time.

She is an amazing wee bitch Backpoon.It took a long time to get her sorted out to get her to races but wait has been worthwhile!

AC

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There's a simple answer to that question and they do not adjust it finishlynx corrects it and that it is true and precise.

When a dog crosses the line it triggers the timing sensor but it could any part of the dog e.g.: chest, foot, leg, neck, nose or head. The advantage of the finishlynx is that it will automatically adjust the time to the exact moment the dog's nose crosses the line. Hence the +/- .02, .01, .03 difference which can be either way.

If it's the neck for example it will be -.02 as it's behind the nose so therefore quicker - or if it's the outstretched foot (in front of the nose) it will be  +.01. If it's the nose then no change.    

Back in the old days before finishlynx it was whatever part of the dog that triggered the sensor that set the time and that was it - no adjustment. It could have quite possibly and arguably been a fraction slower or faster but we'll never know and eventually all these older records will be broken anyway.    

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Thank you, Flabbergasted. Clearly expressed.

I am not so sure about your last statement, though. Were there sensors before the finishlynx system came in? The photo finish was exactly that and black and white. Was the timing not done manually?

I stand to be corrected and await other comments.

 

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Jape,

You are partly correct the sensors haven't changed but next time you're at the track have a look at how small they are. The electric eye part of the sensor is relatively small, about the size of a milk bottle top, usually set atop the running rail on the winning post. It transmits a beam of the same size across the track at that level meaning that whatever part of the dog's body crosses that small beam first trips it. Depending on the size and stride or action of the dog it could be the neck, chest, head, nose neck, foot or part if it's leg. 

It's the same as the sensors in most shop doorways that beep when you walk in. Usually your leg will trip it as you cross the beam however if you stop and wave your hand or a walking stick etc. in front of the sensor it will trip.  

The finishlynx system is linked to the timing mechanism and works in unison with it, providing the precise moment the nose crosses the line rather than whatever part of the body that actually tripped the sensor. Unlike the old black and white photo-finishes which were not linked to the timer and the two operated separately.  

The finishlynx system is used in all codes of racing nowadays due to it's accuracy.

Hope this clarifies the situation. if not maybe next time you go to a track ask the club if you can see how the finishlynx operates and you will then get a better understanding.

 

  

 

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Thanks again, Flabbergasted, but I assure you I know where the sensors are, what they are like and how they operate.

Incidentally, I believe it is the finishlynx operator who "finds the nose", clicks the "button" and provides the line.

I was hoping you - or anyone else - might be able to answer the questions of when the finishlynx system came into operation and when the sectional timing began.

Was there a sensor or sensors at QEII?

As the greyhound races at QEII began in 1975 (after the '74 Commonwealth Games) I assume the CGRC used the system belonging to Canterbury Athletics.

On the other hand, I certainly remember qualifying trials being manually timed.

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To my knowledge the finishlynx system came into being around 20 years ago but exactly when each club utilised it is anyone's guess. 

You are correct again in that the system operator clicks on the nose which automatically imprints the line on the photo finish image. If you look at the bottom of that image there is usually intermediate graph type lines which is the actual hundredths of the integrated timing mechanism. It is precise and accurate.

The photo finish still works the same way with the mirror on the winning post and finishlynx can only take segmented (thousands) of images of every dog (as each part of) it crosses the line. It is segmented and computerisation pieces those segments together to provide the printed image. Many people, who don't know the intricacies of how a photo finish actually works, falsely believe that the printed image is like a frozen video still of when the winner crosses the line with the other dogs behind it, when in fact it is actually an image of each dog at the exact moment it crosses the finish line and that the operator can just manipulate a line where ever they want.   

The old black and white photo-finish worked in much the same way however it took a continual photo for as long as the operator pressed the camera's button to get every dog in the image. In both cases the actual line is the whole image. All the operator can do is draw is draw a line on it in a bid to try and see if there is enough of a margin to separate dogs in a tight photo. The only real difference is that on the finishlynx system that line is automatically generated by the computer and when the operator clicks on each dogs nose which in turn automatically registers the precise time for each dog as well which can be verified down to ten thousandths of a second if necessary in a tight finish.     

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