rosie one

So much fun.... and havent galloped yet

Recommended Posts

As a breeder of what is a middle distance to staying types.

My lad by Zed is up to his 4th preparation... people that are at the track keep asking me when are you going to gallop him? My answer to them is he will show us when he is ready to step up. They answer with how old is he now and i reply with 3.... and hes the type of breed you dont rush, even thou he looks strong hes still got the baby thing going on.

This 4th prep we may even gallop and get to the trials... who knows :)

Why do people think they have to gallop a young horse early?

Do any of breeders / owners think the same way?

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Smart thinking.Horses that are bred to perform over longer distances or when they are older can be 'fried'' if they have too much too early!!!

Depends what you mean by gallop. Nothing wrong in doing 15 seconds per furlong.

Have seen plenty of horses do nothing as late 2yo's but become smart late 3yo's!

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
34 minutes ago, Nasrullah said:

Smart thinking.Horses that are bred to perform over longer distances or when they are older can be 'fried'' if they have too much too early!!!

Depends what you mean by gallop. Nothing wrong in doing 15 seconds per furlong.

Have seen plenty of horses do nothing as late 2yo's but become smart late 3yo's!

 

15 to the furlong in normally under a good riders balancing hold... its called 3/4 pace. This is not a gallop.

You are right, good stayers can sometimes require slow build ups due to one wanting to condition the amimals metal ability as well as clocking up many miles on the conditioning on legs , joints and all the soft tissues connected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, rosie one said:

As a breeder of what is a middle distance to staying types.

My lad by Zed is up to his 4th preparation... people that are at the track keep asking me when are you going to gallop him? My answer to them is he will show us when he is ready to step up. They answer with how old is he now and i reply with 3.... and hes the type of breed you dont rush, even thou he looks strong hes still got the baby thing going on.

This 4th prep we may even gallop and get to the trials... who knows :)

Why do people think they have to gallop a young horse early?

Do any of breeders / owners think the same way?

 

 

 

Like your plan and way of thinking, far to many young horses pushed to their limits to make the 2yr olds,  when not mentally or physically developed, and usually end up lame or broken down, i wouldn't care if they never got to the races till their 4 or 5. Good luck with your charge, and stick to your plan.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most trainers probably get pressure from owners as paying bills to see if it has ability to stop paying unnecessary bills if they are slow. If you can afford to take time then I hope you reap the rewards. BTW I don't agree with the above just stating why people may gallop early. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, optical said:

Most trainers probably get pressure from owners as paying bills to see if it has ability to stop paying unnecessary bills if they are slow. If you can afford to take time then I hope you reap the rewards. BTW I don't agree with the above just stating why people may gallop early. 

This is the conundrum which owners face Optical, especially here in NZ with the costs to train v stakes ratio very poor. Generally the skeleton of a horse stops growing when they are six. Although thoroughbreds bred to be 'early' may muscle up to race well at two, how many horses who raced a number of times as two year olds, are still racing successfully at five or six? - Not many, although there are always exceptions of course (March Legend comes to mind from years gone by). I do lament the lack of time and patience given to many thoroughbreds to allow them to mature, but at the same time, it's hard to criticize those who are forking out big dollars in training fees and want to see the outcome (the chance of a return) sooner rather than later.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
28 minutes ago, bazach said:

This is the conundrum which owners face Optical, especially here in NZ with the costs to train v stakes ratio very poor. Generally the skeleton of a horse stops growing when they are six. Although thoroughbreds bred to be 'early' may muscle up to race well at two, how many horses who raced a number of times as two year olds, are still racing successfully at five or six? - Not many, although there are always exceptions of course (March Legend comes to mind from years gone by). I do lament the lack of time and patience given to many thoroughbreds to allow them to mature, but at the same time, it's hard to criticize those who are forking out big dollars in training fees and want to see the outcome (the chance of a return) sooner rather than later.

Agree with alot of what you have written.

Im lucky in that i can be very hands on working  with the trainer. 

Alot of trainers are pressured to keep pressing forward with their horses even thou they would rather back off

For example, a horse that comes into work and is not been well looked after in the spelling paddock and the trainer has to start from scratch to build the animal up from nothing...this takes extra valuable expensive weeks to do. Everthing is finally going good for the animal and then suddenly under pressure from gallops  and getting to the trials etc the poorly spelled/bugger all feet trimmed animal hit the wall and goes lame/sore.

Working back in a big stable i take my hat off to the trainer for being able to deal with some of these animals.

But this trainer also has to deal with the owners who are pushing to get to the races ... the poor trainer has to tell them its not going to happen this prep and keep his or her fingers crossed they don't lose the owner. Its a catch 22 in some cases.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Our trainer takes the time to let the horse come in, we have a 4yo mare that is at the track now for her 1st prep and have just had a 2yo broken in which seems mentally ready at this stage but will come home shortly to continue growing. We rely on the trainer's opinion as they have the welfare of the horse first and foremost and also ride the horse, they are also quick to tell us when we are wasting money on a horse due to lack of ability. They gave us our first winner 10 years ago and we have stuck with them,  except for a colt that was with a larger stable but we were extremely disappointed. We are encouraged to be at the track to watch them working and do not have any problems with communication.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, skoozi said:

Our trainer takes the time to let the horse come in, we have a 4yo mare that is at the track now for her 1st prep and have just had a 2yo broken in which seems mentally ready at this stage but will come home shortly to continue growing. We rely on the trainer's opinion as they have the welfare of the horse first and foremost and also ride the horse, they are also quick to tell us when we are wasting money on a horse due to lack of ability. They gave us our first winner 10 years ago and we have stuck with them,  except for a colt that was with a larger stable but we were extremely disappointed. We are encouraged to be at the track to watch them working and do not have any problems with communication.

You sound like the type of owners any trainer would appreciate.

Being able to communicate without fear is so important.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
27 minutes ago, skoozi said:

Yes, we like being involved but have no intention of being trainers ourselves, hate paying the bills but know that they are getting the best opportunity.

Enjoy the service your trainer provides, its not a glamorous nor easy job to do...even when the horses are winning your mind is always on what drama is about to unfold. Fingers and toes crossed the horses stay sound and competitive and the staff dont get hurt.

All the best to you and may you win loads more races :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.