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Jacinda Ardern

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On ‎9‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 8:55 AM, rdytdy said:

THEAMSHOW-paula-bennett-100919-1120-1068By General

Bennett Belatedly Hits Her Target Hard

Hansard Report 11/09/19:

Hon PAULA BENNETT (Deputy Leader—National): Thank you, Mr Speaker. I move, That the House take note of miscellaneous business.

he prime minister says she did not know there were sexual assault allegations against one of her staff members until Monday. I could go through the various media reports since 5 August and my own representation since being contacted by victims to show the inconsistencies in this, but they have already been well traversed in the last 24 hours.

Back in 2016, Jacinda Ardern wrote an op-ed about the scandal surrounding the Chiefs rugby team. She said that a resignation is not enough: “It’s the PR quick fix—usher the source of the controversy away. But that solves nothing. After all, apologies followed by silence changes nothing, and change is what we need.”

The resignation today of Nigel Haworth cannot be, in the prime minister’s words, “the PR quick fix—usher the source of the controversy away.” Yes, Mr Haworth needed to go, and it should have happened weeks ago, but what is also known is that the prime minister’s own senior staff and a senior Minister have known the seriousness of the allegations but have not acted.

The complainants were members of the Labour Party. They genuinely believed that the party would listen to their complaints and deal with the alleged offender appropriately, but nothing happened. It clearly has taken an incredible sense of frustration, disappointment, and disillusion for these people to come to me, a National Party MP, to try and see their complaints addressed.

These are serious allegations. The prime minister cannot keep her head in the sand and pretend like it is happening somewhere far, far away. It is happening in her own office, in her own organisation. She is the leader of the Labour Party. The alleged perpetrator works in her leader’s office—he works for her.

Less than a year ago, the prime minister was in New York at the UN, trumpeting “Me too should be we too.” Well, who knew that that meant her own office was following the path well trod by all those companies who drew a curtain over sexual misconduct and inappropriate behaviour.

I have been told by the complainants that Jacinda Ardern’s former chief of staff Mike Monroe knew about the allegations, her chief press secretary, Andrew Campbell, knew about the allegations, and the director of her leader’s office, Rob Salmond, knew about the allegations. I have been told by two victims who work in parliament that they went to Rob Salmond around Christmas time and made a complaint about the alleged perpetrator.

The prime minister has constantly said her office did not receive complaints and, in fact, encouraged the victims to speak to their line managers. They did. They have told me they went to Rob Salmond and nothing was done, and we are expected to believe that none of these men in her own office told the prime minister about the allegations—all of this in the aftermath of the Labour summer camp scandal, when the prime minister made it very clear she expected to have been told. And are we really expected to believe that she didn’t know that her chief press secretary, Andrew Campbell, embarked on a witch-hunt to try and find out who in the Beehive was talking to the media about the allegations? The complainants certainly felt hunted and scared that he was trying to shut them up and stop them from talking to the media—classic bullying of victims, and hardly a victim-led response.

A victim has told me that the alleged perpetrator has deep alliances to Grant Robertson, that he was involved in his campaign for the Labour Party leadership, and that Grant Robertson has known the seriousness of these allegations. It is unbelievable that he hasn’t discussed this with his close friend and his leader.

This all smacks of a cover-up. This goes straight to the top: to the prime minister, to senior Cabinet ministers, and—

SPEAKER: Order! The member’s time has expired.

 

Laughable beatups lead by the ex Taupo truck stop waitress who nevewr DELIBERATELY mislead Social Welfare.

Try the JLR sex scandal if

you really want some scandal.

 

As for Barely Sober...much ado about nothing.

Where was the scrutiny when Key had not been briefed,not been told,..ask Tucker.

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I wondered where the flock you have been. Must be really tough times for you to see your princess has been exposed for all she is or should that be isn't. :)

You are just going to have to suck it up sunshine. She has been woeful over this and at least this will show more people how inept and out of her depth she is. 

Perhaps you had better go around, put on a concerned face and give her a hug.  :rolleyes:

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Jacinda Ardern PM By Christie 

The Media Are Not Your Friends, Jacinda

When Jacinda became the Labour leader and was selected as prime minister, the media couldn’t get enough of her. From magazine covers and photo shoots, her face was everywhere. We have complained bitterly about how they cut her so much slack, and she seemed to get away with murder.

Well, everything has changed. It was only ever a matter of time. Jacinda may have fallen into the trap of thinking that the media love her, but the truth is, they have a job to do. They have recently proved that they will drop anyone like a hot brick if there is a scent of blood anywhere, and they have definitely been sniffing blood in Jacinda’s camp in the last week.

Once again, Jacinda has shown her naivety. She thought she could just lie, obfuscate and pass everything over to a working group or to a pending report, and that everyone would still love her for ever.

It was always going to come crashing down at some point. Now, it has.

Let’s start with Duncan Garner.

Jacinda, meet NZ’s press gallery: they hunt as a pack of underpaid, unloved mongrels who judge life on scalps taken.

Yet this time you’ve gifted them a beauty, a textbook way how not to do something, and how not to cover it up.

It’s simply too hard to accept she didn’t know it was an assault of a sexual nature. 


Her staff knew.
Her party knew.
Parliament knew. The media knew. 
Grant Robertson knew (but can’t say what).
Kelvin Davis heard a rumour in Māori. How helpful.
And even the woman selling the $3 coffees by the lift knew, although Kelvin wasn’t sure if she was talking about the assaults at Labour’s summer camp or this latest one. 
And Labour’s ruling council knew too. Ardern is on that body. Did she sit in on discussions over this? She won’t say. Why not? 

The reason is obvious. She did sit in on the discussions, or at the very least, read the minutes of the meetings.

It was already on notice in the #metoo period, so you’d think all the players would be on heightened alert to get this right.  

Get this right at all times, and not at Ardern’s cost.

But the opposite has happened. Its public talk said inclusion, but behind closed doors the doodling on the paper pads spelt disingenuous.

It looks like Labour put tribalism and its survival first, and the welfare and care of this woman a distant second. It’s no surprise. What a debacle investigating itself. It’s like putting a drug dealer in charge of his own trial. Not guilty, your honour, nothing at all to see here.

And all this when the PM was herself spouting off about the #metoo era being the cleanout and welcome change that was well overdue.

Stuff.


Of course it was. Just not for the Labour party, that’s all.

Then there was John Armstrong.

Are we witnessing the beginning of the end of the Ardern Administration?

How damaging are this week’s extraordinary revelations surrounding Labour’s disgraceful mishandling of sexual assault allegations to the prospects of the party clinging onto power following next year’s election?

Will the exposure of what has to be regarded as a deep vein of hypocrisy, insincerity and cynicism running through the very heart of the governing party turn out to be a tipping point which will end with Labour being tipped out of office?

Has this unseemly episode exposed Jacinda Ardern as both a fake and a flake?

In short, has Labour drastically reduced its chances of retaining the Government benches in Parliament by unwittingly blunting the fire-power of its most potent weapon?

The offhand and shabby treatment by the party of a number of such complaints of alleged sexual assault and misconduct is not just a disgrace. It sits in the realm of the despicable.

Labour claims to be the voice of the powerless fighting against the all-too powerful. In this instance, it was trampling the powerless into the dust.
It has made a nonsense of Ardern’s positioning herself as a promoter of women’s rights and a voice of young voters.

It has made Ardern’s parading of herself as some kind of Mother Theresa-Lite look like a hollow charade.

TVNZ.


There are plenty more like this in the media at the moment. Jacinda has been laid bare. She is all talk but no substance. We all knew that, of course, but now it seems that the media and the general public know it too.

Even The Guardian has waded in for the kill.

It’s a very different Labour party we are seeing this week. The party wing has been exposed as anything but caring and transparent in the #MeToo space, and it’s threatening to bring down not only a number of party officials, but the prime minister herself.

Now, we’re all holding our breath to see what Ardern will do. She claims her officials did not tell her of the serious sexual nature of the complaints – fewer and fewer New Zealanders are ready to believe that this week – but whether true or not, this is her mess to clean up.
Her credentials at home and abroad as a new kind of leader – kind, caring, compassionate and honest – all hang on her next move.

My favourite, however, is Bryce Edwards, who points out that this scandal does not only disappoint non-Labour voters but pulls at the beliefs of Labour voters themselves.

If the political reputation of the Labour-led Government and Jacinda Ardern have been badly or even fatally damaged by the ongoing #MeTooLabour scandal, it will be because they’ve disappointed their own supporters, and failed to live up to their own values.

This is very different to a leftwing government and prime minister being undermined by their opponents or the political right. It’s one thing for opposition MPs, businesspeople, or conservative commentators to condemn the Labour-led Government on something like business confidence or law and order.

Any perceived shortfalls on such matters often don’t actually hurt Labour over the longer-term. But when progressives, party supporters, and the political left are losing trust in the Government, it’s a much more serious problem. It could mean that mobilising those activists and voters at the election is that much more difficult.

However, it’s the fact that progressives and the left are feeling disillusioned with the Prime Minister and Labour that will ultimately determine whether this scandal is of longer-term consequence.

A Newspaper.

Brand Jacinda is black and blue. The fall of the fairy princess is well in progress. And about time.

 

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12 hours ago, rdytdy said:

I wondered where the flock you have been. Must be really tough times for you to see your princess has been exposed for all she is or should that be isn't. :)

You are just going to have to suck it up sunshine. She has been woeful over this and at least this will show more people how inept and out of her depth she is. 

Perhaps you had better go around, put on a concerned face and give her a hug.  :rolleyes:

Your Jacinda derangement syndrome is not good for your blood pressure old sock.

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f78hqy-1068x517.jpgBy WH

You’re Fired! (Words Never Spoken)

In General Debate on Sunday Mick le said:

[…] She didn’t fire Haworth; he resigned. In fact, she has never fired anyone: they have either resigned or been moved aside. And there have been many scandals and sackable offences over the last 24months of the CoLs tenure.
What if Jacinda really isn’t the Leader of the Labour Party and really is only the “Face”? This would explain why she is completely useless and powerless. […]

theBFD


Thumbing randomly through Facebook the other night, as you do, I came across Ardern’s Maiden Speech to parliament. To save your time and sanity here is the Hansard transcript of two interesting bits.

JACINDA ARDERN (Labour): Mr Assistant Speaker, I am honoured to stand in this House today, and I join my colleagues who have gone before me in congratulating you on your election as Assistant Speaker. Maiden statements are a bit like words spoken in a heated argument; like it or not, they will come back to haunt one. Today I will share with members the words that I wish to haunt me: my values and beliefs, and the things that have brought me here. I do so in the hope that should I ever abandon them, I will have the good grace to leave.

Around the five-minute mark we have this gem:

Morrinsville College was also the place where I experienced my first election, campaigning on the weighty electoral issue that girls should be allowed to wear trousers to school. I was elected to the Morrinsville College board of trustees and was subsequently appointed to the suspension committee as the student representative. It was tough. I sat face to face with my peers who were facing removal from the education system. Although I had no qualms about handing down punishment to those students who were bullies in our school, I also saw many come before us who quite clearly had no emotional or financial support from their families, from their caregivers, or from their community

Hansard


So, among the “values and beliefs, and the things that have brought” Ardern to parliament was the experience of handing down punishment to those who deserved it. Ardern has told us that she would never lie in politics and had never lied so that must include her maiden speech.

We must thus believe her about her strength of character and fortitude when it comes to punishing those who have infringed. However, the last week has revealed a huge failure to be so resolute in such matters.

Therefore we must take comfort in the fact that Ardern (who never lies) has told us what she expects of herself in such a situation.

I do so in the hope that should I ever abandon them, I will have the good grace to leave.

Oh … look! The porcine aviators outside my window just did a full barrel roll at the end of a stall climb, all without breaking formation. Got to go and watch some more …

 

 

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There were 4 women who made claims of sexual assault by Jamie Lee Rossi. Bennett swept them under the carpet! A real scandal atm is National s Chinese spy MP and his recent trip with  Bridges to meet senior CPR  security officers.And let's not forget the confirmation that Collins coy was involved in the broken fuel pipeline that disrupted supplies.

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Meanwhile wily Winston has his feet up at Whananaki keeping the kind of low profile that only suits him when the bloodhounds are out and he may be savaged by association. He must know he and Jones et al are toast if they stay aligned with Labour. He must be wondering if/when to jump wakas and play in the sandpit with Simon. 

In all seriousness, the state of politics in this country is shambolic, disgraceful. If it weren't so serious, it'd be laughable. Jacinda's advisors will be hoping that the Rugby World Cup will be distraction enough, but this serious crime scandal is not going to be allowed to die. It's what the Parliamentary Press Gallery live for.

Could wily Winston be engineering the downfall of his coalition partner? What chance an early election, with or without Jacinda?

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15 minutes ago, weasel57 said:

Meanwhile wily Winston has his feet up at Whananaki keeping the kind of low profile that only suits him when the bloodhounds are out and he may be savaged by association. He must know he and Jones et al are toast if they stay aligned with Labour. He must be wondering if/when to jump wakas and play in the sandpit with Simon. 

In all seriousness, the state of politics in this country is shambolic, disgraceful. If it weren't so serious, it'd be laughable. Jacinda's advisors will be hoping that the Rugby World Cup will be distraction enough, but this serious crime scandal is not going to be allowed to die. It's what the Parliamentary Press Gallery live for.

Could wily Winston be engineering the downfall of his coalition partner? What chance an early election, with or without Jacinda?

What??? An early election because of this. It's hardly Watergate. If something of this nature leads to an early election then we'll be having elections called every 3 months.

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4 hours ago, Uriah Heap said:

What??? An early election because of this. It's hardly Watergate. If something of this nature leads to an early election then we'll be having elections called every 3 months.

It may e the catakyst for an early election ....not this side of Christmas, but in 2020

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5 hours ago, weasel57 said:

Meanwhile wily Winston has his feet up at Whananaki keeping the kind of low profile that only suits him when the bloodhounds are out and he may be savaged by association. He must know he and Jones et al are toast if they stay aligned with Labour. He must be wondering if/when to jump wakas and play in the sandpit with Simon. 

In all seriousness, the state of politics in this country is shambolic, disgraceful. If it weren't so serious, it'd be laughable. Jacinda's advisors will be hoping that the Rugby World Cup will be distraction enough, but this serious crime scandal is not going to be allowed to die. It's what the Parliamentary Press Gallery live for.

Could wily Winston be engineering the downfall of his coalition partner? What chance an early election, with or without Jacinda?

I tend to agree with you weasel57 but I do have a suspicion winstons health might be a problem as well , he's been gone for along time .

The friend of mine I  quoted who went to stewart island also had a leg operation but in his case the operation involved removing a vein from his leg to replace veins in his heart .

No doubt about it thought Winston is toast the next time around , abandoning cindy is his only chance to keep nzf alive .

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So Trump is meeting with Jacinda next week.

Wouldn't it be great to be a fly on the wall.

He knows her spy agency illegally spied on him to overthrow him. (Treason)

He knows climate change is a scam.

He knows Chch was a deep state false flag...and he knows she knows.

He knows the Clinton Foundation is a huge crime syndicate under state investigation.

He is well down the process of taking down Jacinda and her corrupt globalist mates.

Will he tell her straight or let her linger?

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BFD Transcript: Jacinda Ardern on Whether Grant Robertson’s Head Will Roll

By Suze

Mike:

Now, I know that you… I know what you announced yesterday and I know what you want to talk about this morning and I… can we just preface all of this – there’s just a couple of questions I’ve got that don’t appear to have been answered by you – so if we can focus on those, that would be good.

One of them, is that I told you on this programme on the 6th of August there was a sexual assault complaint, ahh… from that time until last Monday you appear not to have known that that was the case. Why not?

Ardern:

(Sucks in breath) Ahh… again, just for the sake of clarity here, Mike, there’s obviously still contested information in…in facts in this case, which is why I’ve… I’ve created now a space where complainants can ultimately be heard. But also, we’ll look at ourselves and what the Labour Party knew and what it should have been doing ahh… in light of the information it had.

For the sake of ah… answering the question you’ve just asked me though, we’ve been very clear on this and what was published in the Spinoff, the claim that someone, ah, went to the Labour Party and claimed that they had been um… ahh… sexually assaulted are very serious allegations documented there I was never aware of that. Ah… of course, there were ah… some five weeks prior, ah, many reporting ah… around ah… whether or not ah… issues of ah… ah… a sexual nature or of a serious allegations, ah, were reported in the media um… we’ve been very open about that point in time, where that was raised and I asked questions directly of the Labour party um… made it very clear that if this was what the Labour Party was being told they should not be investigating. Got answers from them that I have to say in hindsight I was… am not satisfied with, but we brought in a QC at that point in time…

Mike:

Okay.

Ardern:

…because it was clear at that point there were clear failings in what was happening.

Mike:

So, the image that you’ve Laboured under for the past week by most of the media that you somehow don’t indulge in any form of media and you claim last Monday this was a revelation. What you are now explaining to us is that the Spinoff highly detailed account is the first literal account that you saw as opposed to the broad-based understanding there was a sexual assault allegation.

Ardern:

Actually… actually… Mike, I’ve probably done some eight or nine stand-ups on this and I have been consistent on that. Um… this is somethink I answered… on the day itself, the day itself it was published. This is somethink I’ve been very clear on right from the beginning.

The issue now, Mike, is that we are going back and forth on contested information that is not taking us any closer to (a) having the complainants heard; (b) making sure that there is greater clarity around what the Labour Party knew and how it dealt with this. You will have seen that yesterday we still have members of the Labour Party contesting that.

Mike:

Yep.

Ardern:

We need to get to a point of clarity. What I set out yesterday is a plan to do that.

Mike:

If it’s found that you knew about this before you said you did, would you resign?

Ardern:

Ah… again Mike, that’s… that’s not even an issue because I know what I know. I know what I know ahh… and I’ve been very clear on that and I have absolutely no concern with us being public with the information and the findings of what we will have a third party to look into. Um… because I’ve been absolutely clear all the way through on this and the one point, I’d ask you, Mike, why wouldn’t I act on somethink that serious?

Mike:

Well, that’s the question everybody’s asking because you didn’t.

Ardern:

I’ve… actually… I’ve just contested that, Mike, but again we can continue, we can go around in circles on this or we can actually have a process in place that gets to the bottom of it and that gives us clarity, that doesn’t just rely on a ‘he said she said’.

Mike:

If you say you’ve been clear, Grant Robertson hasn’t, why hasn’t he?

Ardern:

(Sucks in breath) He’s stated all the way through when he’s been asked questions on this that he doesn’t wish to compromise the privacy of the individuals involved or ultimately, as I’ve just said, get into contesting some of the information in the public domain.

We’ve set up a… we’ve set up a process now Mike, and we’re going to stick to that.

Mike:

Has he told you what he knows?

Ardern:

Again… as I’ve said, I don’t want to get into this ongoing contesting of facts between complainants and the Labour Party. I just want a process that’s going to bring some clarity and ultimately one that puts complainants at the centre. Everyone has to acknowledge here what is happening in the public domain for complainants is very far from best practice. It’s about as far as you could be. We need to start bringing this back to what was ultimately the cause, and that is some serious allegations that need to be investigated.

Mike:

If the QC’s report find Grant Robertson knew something and you didn’t do something, is that a… is that a crime that you would expect a resignation from?

Ardern:

The QC is ahh… looking into the complaints and… ahh… ahh…

Mike:

Who’s looking into what Grant Robertson…

Ardern:

Just to be clear we acknowledge we need to create a separate investigation of what the Labour Party knew. We’ve done that. I’m bringing in a third party to do that.

Mike:

Who’s the third party?

Ardern:

Well, I have to settle on a name that both complainants ahh… and of course the party’s happy with. So, we will be resolving that over the next few days. Ah… originally, of course, we already had the Labour Party’s own lawyer looking at the process it undertook. We…

Mike:

Was that wise?

Ardern:

Mike, no, in my view… obviously that’s why we are bringing in a third party. Um… but… ahh… um… Grant Robertson has said he will absolutely fully participate ahh… in any questions that may wish to be asked um… through that process.

Mike:

So, I go back to the question. If he or you are found wanting in this will either of you resign?

Ardern:

That will not be the case. I have always said…

Mike:

How do you know that? Why have an investigation if you know the outcome?

Ardern:

Ahh… because I know. Ahh…

Mike:

You know what Grant knows?

Ardern:

Um… Mike, it’s… you’re not going to have to rely on us. We’ve put in place a process that we will make fully transparent.

Mike:

Well is it a process? You’ve just given us the outcome of the process.

Ardern:

Of course, I am going to continue to stand by my actions (chuckles) Mike, you’d expect me to.

Mike:

But you are not answering on Grant Robertson. Robertson won’t answer. You won’t answer on behalf of Grant Robertson, why not?

Ardern:

Yes, I have. And the fact that he is participating fully and will be open in answering any questions for that third-party review should also answer that question.

Mike:

And if he is found wanting, does he resign? And if you are found wanting, do you resign?

Ardern:

Again, Mike, I… I know the undertakings I have made in this case. I stand by all of them and we will be making public that final review and ahh…

Mike:

Well, you won’t. Won’t you be making it all public?

Jacinda:

Yes.

Mike:

Because yesterday I… I heard a whole lot of riders.

Jacinda:

The only… the only rider I’ve given is, as you would expect Mike, these are obviously um… ahh… involved ahh… details that will be quite private to some of the complainants so of course we need to keep that in mind.

Mike:

Do you still believe the complainant?

Jacinda:

(Sucks in breath) I’ve always said to take a victim-centred approach, and you’d expect that from me. Ahh… that hasn’t been what’s happened in the process to date though so that’s what I am trying to right.

Mike:

Given what Simon Mitchell said yesterday and what Haworth’s already said, where’s the third member of the group and what… what have they got to say? And do you know what they’ve got to say if they did say anything, as to whether there was a sexual assault allegation?

Jacinda:

So, you are going to have to explain that question to me again, sorry.

Mike:

The person who’s the party president at the moment, were they part of the panel?

Jacinda:

No. Ahh… oh sorry, the president… there is… technically we only have an acting senior…

Mike:

That’s what I’m saying. Was she part of the panel originally?

Jacinda:

Again, that’s in… in the public domain ahh… but that is now somethink of course that is immaterial to what I am trying to set out here. We’ve got a process in place; I am speaking to it.

Mike:
Yeah, I’m just asking, does she think there was a sexual assault allegation or was she another one that says there wasn’t one in the first place?

Jacinda:

Again, Mike, this has been contested by the Labour Party and I don’t want to continue to get into a “he said, she said”. The Labour Party has always contested some of what’s been in the public domain. I’ve now set out a process so we do not have to continue to have this heard publicly. We actually have given the complainants a place to do it in a way that’s appropriate.

Mike:

Your staffer who resigned, was he paid out?

Jacinda:

(Sucks in breath) I accepted a resignation, ultimately beyond that, that’s a matter for parliamentary services which unfortunately I am not involved in. Also, it’s an employment matter.

Mike:

And if he was found wanting in these investigations would that pay out be brought into question?

Jacinda:

I… again that is… obviously ahh… not some think that I am going to traverse. It’s an employment matter for parliamentary services. But I do want to say, Mike, ahh… that actually we do need a process here that allows yes, the complainants to be heard, but also the accused. I know, given the number of interviews I’ve had with you before that will be a principle that will be important to you as well.

Mike:

Having said that, if he is found wanting, this bloke who resigned, and he was paid out, that will be a question as to whether that money…

Jacinda:

Well actually, ultimately Mike, if that’s… if that is the result of the QC, actually I would want that to go to the police. That’s where these things…

Mike:

Well, we all wanted it to go to the police but the…. but it hasn’t. And that’s at the… that’s at the doorstep of the complainant isn’t it?

Jacinda:

It is ultimately their call. It is, you’re right. And they’ve made that decision not to, to date. So, we are trying to create a process that is alternative to that. But of course, it was always in my preference… one thing I can tell you is that it shou… where it cannot be dealt with is the Labour Party.

Mike:

Kelvin Davis in the house speaking Te Reo last week said this whole thing’s been driven by rumour and gossip. Do you back him up on that?

Jacinda:

Ahh… again I… I… I don’t think that’s necessarily a fair and… I’m not the person to be asking… in Te Reo…

Mike:

That’s precisely what he said.

Jacinda:

No… no it isn’t.

Mike:

Well, we asked Shane Jones and this is what he said it was gossip. The word he used was gossip.

Jacinda:

I’ve also been told that the words can also mean allegation so I don’t want to get into um, ahh… a discussion here on something that I can’t fully contest because my Te Reo is… is not in a place where I can…

Mike:

All right. Winston Peters was on this station yesterday in English and he said it’s a disgraceful orgy of speculation and innuendo. Is it?

Jacinda:

That is… that is… again that is a matter for ministers to… Peters’ interpretation of it…

Mike:

Well, what would your interpretation of his interpretation be?

Jacinda:

My job is to get finally, to the bottom of this issue in a way that allows complainants to be heard. That’s what I set out yesterday, Mike, and what I’m going to stick to.

Mike:

Is there a time frame on any of this?

Jacinda:

The QC originally gave me a suggestion ahh… or… or… gave the party a suggestion ah… of four weeks. I’m… I’m a bit hesitant on that because since then I believe ahh… the terms of reference might have changed so um… my… my expectation is that it’ll probably be more than that. Perhaps maybe… perhaps maybe seven or eight.

Mike:

Third party?

Jacinda:

Third party will ultimately still want someone there. That I believe could be done more quickly than that because of course, as I’ve mentioned, the Labour Party already started a process of looking at the evidence that it had received and the process that looked into that is halfway done. That’ll be handed over to that third-party reviewer though.

 

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Interesting interview (Hosking/Ardern).

1. Jacinda must be absolutely gutted that the complainant(s) didnt go to the police. If it had, she wouldn't be dealing with all this fallout.

2 IMO Jacinda and Robertson  are in deep doo-doo now, because this will not go away. Nothing she says or does on the international stage will fix it.

3 The Labour Government is a gone-burger. So is Winnie's party - unless he builds bridges with Bridges. 

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When will cindy show judgement ?? , I  know , I  get it she doesn't know what she is doing but I live in hope . How long do we have to wait for tyford to be tossed out , his achievements are nil , here we go again .

Transport Minister Phil Twyford has replaced almost the entirety of the NZ Transport Agency's board, prompting accusations from the Opposition that he's passing the buck. 

The NZTA also has yet to replace its chief executive, with former Chorus CEO Mark Ratcliffe serving as temporary chief since the resignation of Fergus Gammie in December. Twyford has had three chairs, after the resignation of Michael Stiassny in April after a shake-up at the agency.

Asked why he had made the sweeping changes, Twyford replied: "What we're doing is cleaning up the mess that National left after nine years of NZTA under National's leadership. Sound familiar .

This fool was going to clean up the housing issue , that didn't work out to well , All talk , all failure just hopeless.

The truth is NZTA has been making it very clear it's a lack of government funding that's NZTAs biggest problem  , cindys lot don't like the truth being told . .

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When will cindy show judgement ?? , I  know , I  get it she doesn't know what she is doing but I live in hope . How long do we have to wait for tyford to be tossed out , his achievements are nil , here we go again .

That Tilford sounds like a recently resigning CEO re achievements are nil, at least he resigned before getting tossed out. Good to know Tripple Alliance that you acknowledge that when someones achievements are nil they have to go.

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 cindy stupidity .

“  The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released their quarterly energy report , which shows a 19 per cent reduction in electricity produced by natural gas, but a whopping 62 per cent increase in electricity produced by coal over the last year.

“ This makes New Zealand the only country in the world that is transitioning out of gas and into coal. ''

“MBIE advised the Minister of Energy on 10 April 2018 that gas reserves were at the lowest reserve to production level since 2003 and no new discoveries had been made since 2005.

“Two days later, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern announced a ban on future exploration permits.

“New Zealand is now paying the price for this reckless, ideological decision as our dependence on coal has actually increased. ''

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MorrisonArdern-1068x601.jpgBy JC

Morrison and Ardern – Chalk and Cheese

 

The treatment Australian Prime Minister Scott Morison is receiving in America highlights the stark difference in the regard in which New Zealand and Australia are held by President Trump. It shows the contrast between being a trusted ally and just a friend.

It also brings into focus the disparity of leadership abilities of the respective prime ministers. One has the ability to make the hard decisions based purely on the evidence in front of him and knowing what is the correct call to make. He is a leader who understands where the world is at the present time and the part Australia should rightfully play in it.

The other defers to working groups and, as Suze has pointed out, most likely Helen Clark, who it seems is very much creating a cacophony in the background. What we all knew from the outset is now becoming more obvious by the day. Jacinda is not up to the task of being prime minister either at home or abroad. She is fast becoming an embarrassment to this country, and the likes of President Trump are giving her a few minutes of their valuable time out of pure courtesy.

Compare this to Scott Morrison. On his state visit he will dine on a fillet of Dover sole under the stars in a Rose Garden arrayed in shades of green and gold in tribute to his nation’s national colours. His is Donald Trump’s first state dinner in over a year. Morrison is just the second world leader to be granted the high diplomatic honour of a state visit during the Trump administration. He was welcomed to the White House with a pomp filled military arrival ceremony on the South Lawn.

Dinner centrepieces featured more than 2,500 roses in shades of yellow, and Australia’s national flower, the wattle. Morrison said “There are many larger, I suppose, more powerful friends that America has, but they do not have a more sure and steadfast friend than Australia”. Could Jacinda say that? In all honesty no, but with her track record of mendacity it’s not beyond the bounds of possibility. Not that it really matters as her chances of getting a state dinner are about as good as Labour winning Hunua.

It is a sorry fact that Winston Peters decided to put personal grievances ahead of the good of the country and installed in office a person who doesn’t even know which country she’s landed in. Her grasp of world affairs goes no further than what’s written in the United Nations playbook of left wing doctrine which, if implemented, would spell disaster for the planet. She probably won’t get as many seconds with Trump as Morrison got roses at his opulent state dinner.

If we are to be taken seriously on the world stage again this lady and her rag tag bunch of numskulls need to be dispatched at the earliest opportunity, i.e. next year, or before if the opportunity arises.

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So Jacinda is speaking to the UN (deep state) about the Christchurch Call that basically is trying to shut down free speech.

How ironic it is that Jacinda blocked access to 8 chan for NZders  following Chch and for the past 2 years Trump has been using that same channel to expose the atrocities of her deep state and spread truth to the people.....(interesting conversation coming up)

Why did they ban the Chch video?

Because it is fake?

It clearly shows he did not act alone.

Time to wake up to your corrupt deep state controlled government.

Now can someone here please answer this guys questions....if not your still asleep.

 

 

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Take that Jacinda

Candace Owens responding to the Mosque shooting.

Jacinda wrongly blaming white supremacy when in fact there are about 0.001% of the population fall into that category.

They want you divided.

You can guarantee the hijab wearing and poster girl MSM promos were all part of the deep state plan organised well before the event. One giant psyops and Kiwis fell for it hook line and sinker.

 

 

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