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christen me

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True comment Tim, it is the few cowboys still about that think they can be smarter than vets and ruin approvals for useful drugs. I am not against lasix but hrnz is looking at a drug free world so all horses run on their merits.(this utopia not possible as most horses need diff remedies tokeep racing.)By the way Tim,  you sponsored a race we won back in August 2017, at Cambridge  . so many many thanks. 

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Great to see Christen Me living up to his potential in the US. They're aiming him at all the major FFA's across America in the year ahead, including next years Breeders Crown!

His sale to the US was a fantastic deal for all concerned. Firstly, his former owners would have pocketed a pretty penny from the sale, which they'll no doubt re-invest in the industry by buying more young stock. Secondly, his new owners have bought themselves a relatively lightly raced horse that can mix it with the best America has to offer. And finally, the horse, who now has the opportunity to do what he does best, and was bred to do - run sensational miles!

A true Win - Win - Win - And long may it continue!

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3 hours ago, john legend said:

I feel for you Jack .. there is no logics to be discussed you simply do not get the problem.

What problem?

The horse was born and bred to race. Incidentally, something that he does very well. He's had maybe 75 starts in his life, and is as sound as a bell. He bleeds a little, so what, so do 90% of horses to some degree in any given race, and in the US it's as treatable as tying up is in NZ.

Are you going to retire every horse that has the slightest ailment, or reaches the 75 start mark?

The horse obviously enjoys racing or he wouldn't be performing at the level he is.

Champions are born to run, not sit around in a paddock to make the do-gooders feel better about themselves!

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1 hour ago, JackSprat said:

Champions are born to run, not sit around in a paddock to make the do-gooders feel better about themselves!

About sums it up Jack. Just watched his race. Made the hair stand up on the back of my neck, great to see him waving the NZ flag.

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18 hours ago, JackSprat said:

What problem?

The horse was born and bred to race. Incidentally, something that he does very well. He's had maybe 75 starts in his life, and is as sound as a bell. He bleeds a little, so what, so do 90% of horses to some degree in any given race, and in the US it's as treatable as tying up is in NZ.

Are you going to retire every horse that has the slightest ailment, or reaches the 75 start mark?

The horse obviously enjoys racing or he wouldn't be performing at the level he is.

Champions are born to run, not sit around in a paddock to make the do-gooders feel better about themselves!

This is a myth that has been spread around for years by greedy trainers that horses love racing, particularily after years of racing after injuries and so on.If this horse bleeds then it has serious problems with his lungs. I know because we had  to retire our best horse after 78 starts because it became a bleeder.

This is about looking after the welfare of the horse, which the owners of Christen Me obviously aren't interested in. By the way we had vets scope our horse and they still don't know what causes bleeding. 

Champions are born to run when they are fit and healthy, not when they need drugs to keep them racing.

I agree with John. 

Jack you just don't get it.

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6 hours ago, Alan B said:

This is about looking after the welfare of the horse, which the owners of Christen Me obviously aren't interested in.

Bull shit. Have you personally rung the owners and asked them their opinion on the horses welfare ?. Do you have insider knowledge on the present condition of the horse ?. I doubt both the aforementioned .

Or is this as Jack alluded to , do gooders feeling better about themselves after venting their misinformed opinions.

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7 hours ago, Alan B said:

This is a myth that has been spread around for years by greedy trainers that horses love racing, particularily after years of racing after injuries and so on.If this horse bleeds then it has serious problems with his lungs. I know because we had  to retire our best horse after 78 starts because it became a bleeder.

This is about looking after the welfare of the horse, which the owners of Christen Me obviously aren't interested in. By the way we had vets scope our horse and they still don't know what causes bleeding. 

Champions are born to run when they are fit and healthy, not when they need drugs to keep them racing.

I agree with John. 

Jack you just don't get it.

90% of horses bleed while racing.

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7 hours ago, Alan B said:

This is a myth that has been spread around for years by greedy trainers that horses love racing, particularily after years of racing after injuries and so on.If this horse bleeds then it has serious problems with his lungs. I know because we had  to retire our best horse after 78 starts because it became a bleeder.

This is about looking after the welfare of the horse, which the owners of Christen Me obviously aren't interested in. By the way we had vets scope our horse and they still don't know what causes bleeding. 

Champions are born to run when they are fit and healthy, not when they need drugs to keep them racing.

I agree with John. 

Jack you just don't get it.

The word "bleeding" is a highly emotive term, which you appear to understand little about. You might be interested to learn that at least 90% of harness horses "bleed" to some extent during a race, and close to 100% of gallopers do. It only becomes a problem for a very small percentage of horses, and they identify themselves quickly, as their perform levels drop off markedly .... no matter what medication they're on.

Christen Me is racing in as good a form as he has at any stage of his career, so his level of bleeding is obviously at the lower end of the scale. He'll probably race out his career on lasix, which isn't uncommon in north America, particularly for older horses, for whom it is more or less a standard "maintenance medication".

The only thing I "don't get" is where you get this ridiculous idea from that Christen Me is not being well looked after.

You might want to take a look at some of the videos created by Heather Vitale to see the way he's looked after. Rather than bad mouthing those responsible for his care and welfare, you'd see that he's actually treated more like equine royalty!

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57 minutes ago, JackSprat said:

The word "bleeding" is a highly emotive term, which you appear to understand little about. You might be interested to learn that at least 90% of harness horses "bleed" to some extent during a race, and close to 100% of gallopers do. It only becomes a problem for a very small percentage of horses, and they identify themselves quickly, as their perform levels drop off markedly .... no matter what medication they're on.

Christen Me is racing in as good a form as he has at any stage of his career, so his level of bleeding is obviously at the lower end of the scale. He'll probably race out his career on lasix, which isn't uncommon in north America, particularly for older horses, for whom it is more or less a standard "maintenance medication".

The only thing I "don't get" is where you get this ridiculous idea from that Christen Me is not being well looked after.

You might want to take a look at some of the videos created by Heather Vitale to see the way he's looked after. Rather than bad mouthing those responsible for his care and welfare, you'd see that he's actually treated more like equine royalty!

I understand most horses bleed internally. I am told that if a horse bleeds externally from the nostrils more than 3 individual times after a race in Australia, then the horse is banned for life from racing.  "Maintenance medication" to be able to continue to racing, if that is what you consider being looked after is then so be it. Otherwise, I have no doubt the horse is treated like equine royalty in the stable, horses from top stables usually are.  

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I thought the reason it was banned everywhere except America was because it is seen as a performance enhancer. Given 4 hours before the race  a horse will urinate 10 to 15 litres and end up losing 5 to 10 kg, which it is believed is a major reason they run faster. As well as that it is apparently believed that fluid loss is one of the things which has a positive effect on  the bleeding, at least that is what the experts say.      Has something with similar effects been used in nz???   You would have to wonder . Horses performances resulting in specific symptons have occurred on raceday here previously, with  literature relating to the said problems being linked to dehydration in horses. Who knows.  Just  guessing.   You could argue why send a horse to America if there was something which they had available here..

The point I guess is some believe that horses who require drugs to race, with possible long term effects on the horses health, should not continue to race and they should be retired.  Of course most use racehorses as a commodity, and unfortunately for many their days would be numbered should they no longer be able to race. That's the real world. I can see both sides of the argument.

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