iwmcn

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  1. iwmcn

    dean mckenzie

    Like I said in another post which got no response.....OUTSOURCE to TABCORP (betting) and SKY (communications). Both public companies accountable to shareholders which NZ badly needs. What do we have to loose. As John Messara said ....start again with a blank piece of paper and rewrite the rules and policies to suit now and the future. Brian De Lore in the Optimist has now clarified that long debated question as to who owns the TAB .......the CLUBS. This makes one hell of a difference as to how that blank piece of paper is compiled. Read the following facts from Brian Delores recent article in the Optimist which I have done a cut and paste from. Ivan W.Mc Nicholl 021679639 Breeder. Owner and Punter. Wellington The September 1950s publication that says the TAB was the concept of The New Zealand Racing Conference and the New Zealand Harness Conference and was underwritten by the race clubs of New Zealand. The document sets out the formation of the TAB – it’s dated 20th September 1950. It clearly states that the New Zealand Racing Conference and the New Zealand Trotting Conference came together to start the TAB and that the start-up costs were underwritten by the racing clubs of New Zealand. Racing has said this anecdotally for years, but to see it in writing is a big deal – it’s proof the codes and the clubs own the TAB and that the tail has been wagging the dog for years, and that now needs to change. The document is 70-years-old, but unless a subsequent paper exists which cedes the ownership to the Government (and none exists), racing is the rightful owner. The beautiful thing is it makes the proposed legislation of the Racing Reform Bill redundant. The Bill at its first reading can be summarised as a paper that took away all of racing’s rights and decision making, stole the IP, provided the Minister with the eternal right of interference and control, and opened the door for sports to come in and be a partner in the business at no cost to them. It did nothing to improve racing. Ownership of the TAB means that racing can, with pride and a significant degree of scorn towards the pretenders, hold up its middle finger to all that nonsense and say, ‘we’ll have back what’s ours, thank you very much.’ The Transport and Infrastructure Select Committee had a meeting yesterday with the PCO (Parliamentary Counsel Office) to initiate the Bills rewriting, which is expected to incorporate something like 120 changes and became a document far more acceptable to the needs of racing. The second reading of the Racing Reform Bill could now be by mid to late April – that’s if Covid-19 hasn’t closed down parliament by that time? Brian de Loresays: March 21, 2020 at 11:10 am I understand the TAB is a body corporate, but it should be reclassified as a private company which would allow the codes to negotiate their IP as they see fit Reply The good news: the codes own the TAB! The bad news: the TAB is broke! by Brian de Lore Published 20th March 2020 Today’s stuff.co.nz article blaming the coronavirus for RITA having to go to the Government, cap in hand, for a cash hand-out to save the TAB is yet another blatant example of attempting to pull the wool over the eyes of racing’s long-suffering stakeholders. RITA is today saying it needs a Government bail-out to alleviate a projected $14 million loss through sporting event cancellations and a $3.8 million error they made from offering bonus bets, but the truth of the matter is that the TAB was broke before coronavirus cancelled most sports. It brings to mind that famous quote from American politician Rahm Emanuel: “You never let a serious crisis go to waste. And what I mean by that it’s an opportunity to do things you think you could not do before.” Coronavirus has thrown RITA a life-line excuse – or they think it has. It will also become a matter of fact the yet to be released half-year result (ending January 2020) will show RITA was about $4 million behind budget and regardless of the Covid-19 explosion worldwide was heading for another disastrous end of year result. In the SOI (Statement Of Intent) RITA said: “Net profit before distributions for the 2019/20 financial year is budgeted at $165.8 million, an increase of $29.1 million (+21.3%) on the net profit before distributions for 2018/19 of $136.7 million. It is underpinned by a combination of revenue growth including full-year benefits from the new Fixed Odds Betting platform, recovery in elite betting activity, growth in gaming and other key revenue initiatives, and a reduction in operating expenses.” The $165.8 million is a pipedream and is now likely to be closer to $130 million That appeared on the RITA website on 12/11/19. The $165.8 million is a pipedream and is now likely to be closer to $130 million; a budget-miss result of something like $35 million – it’s inevitable the TAB will soon announce stakes money decreases because it’s hard to see the Government fronting with any cash. The reason it gets worse between now and year’s end is because the RITA budget took into account increased profits from two new sport betting options introduced from February, which included something called ‘hockey stick.’ But it hasn’t happened and now with sport cancelled the budget falls into the ‘miss by a mile’ category. The other thing about this story is that it reeks of stage-management by RITA. How else could this story have gone to Stuff had it not been sent in a press release to the media website or a Stuff staff reporter had not received an invitation to attend? Stephen Henry: Coronavirus is threatening to bring down the TAB, which has asked for a cash injection from the Government so it can keep operating. In the story, it said: “Coronavirus is threatening to bring down the TAB, which has asked for a cash injection from the Government so it can keep operating. “It’s serious enough that we have briefed Government today on what it means for us and how they can help, and that includes injecting cash into the business so we can continue to operate. “Henry told stunned workers that everything was being done to minimise its operating costs, including: * Using fewer cameras at race meetings, doing away with Trackside presenters on course, sending fewer production staff, and not operating betting totes. * Cutting a wide range of expenses like travel and overtime – “we should have cut the sausage rolls today.” Chief Operating Officer Stephen Henry quoted above has been part of the leadership team for a considerable period and coincidentally was with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with John Allen before arriving at NZRB – not long after John Allen made the shift. Everyone in racing should be offended by the Henry joke about saving the sausage rolls Everyone in racing should be offended by the Henry joke about saving the sausage rolls when he has been part of the NZRB gravy-train that over two-and-a-half years ago was earmarked for ‘urgent review of the operating costs.’ Needless to say, that review never happened, and Henry remains one of six in the RITA leadership team on a $300,000/year or above salary, and the costs of RITA according to the last annual report was $211 million. Also, Henry mentioned saving travel expenses – that shouldn’t be too difficult given the same annual report says they have been spending $54,000 a week on travel and accommodation. A decent CEO could have gone into NZRB/RITA at any stage in recent history and slashed the costs, but no one in power has displayed either the know-how or the appetite to do it, or both. John Allen was politically appointed, and his tenure cost the industry $200 million when you consider the cost of building the FOB was $50 million and the on-going commitments to pay Paddy Power and Open Bet for five and 10-year terms. Henry’s cost-cutting is too little, too late, and his plea to the Government for a hand-out is certain to get some eyes rolling at the Beehive Henry’s cost-cutting is too little, too late, and his plea to the Government for a hand-out is certain to get some eyes rolling at the Beehive. If three years ago, we’d had a CEO saving just 10 percent per annum of costs – a very achievable target – today we would be $64 million better off. Just 10 percent per annum for three years and racing would not owe the ANZ Bank $35 plus million and wouldn’t be asking the Government to bail-out an institution that is now flat broke. But the thing that racing can say to the Government is that “you have been making all the appointments and this gravy-train is full of ex-Foreign Affairs and Post Office employees – so it’s mostly your fault.’ Since NZRB finished and RITA arrived, the fortunes of racing have continued to decline. Racing was let-down by the failure of RITA to put a big broom through the management and start with Messara’s blank sheet of paper. Nothing changed of any consequence which brought to mind Einstein’s definition of insanity – ‘doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.’ That definition is now a cliché in racing. Dean McKenzie replaced John Allen in January, but on appearances, he looks to have become part of their team rather than making any waves with the introduction of an alternative style of leadership to turn the tide. RITA’s submission to the Select Committee was a massive disappointment to the industry, and McKenzie’s decision to leave the building immediately afterwards and not listen to the three-code submission was rightly viewed with some derision. Information received today tells a different story to the $3.8 million error on bonus bets that Hendry is claiming. And that is, it wasn’t an error but involves some creative accounting that requires an independent investigation. The word of description was ‘smokescreen.’ The original intention this morning wasn’t to write any of the material you have read above. The focus was intended to be a document entitled ‘NZ Racing and Trotting Conferences Off-Course Betting Scheme,’ which came into my possession about three weeks ago. It’s possibly the most important paper for New Zealand racing’s future if indeed it can survive the immediate issues of coronavirus, insolvency, and the prospect of racing closing for a period. The September 1950s publication that says the TAB was the concept of The New Zealand Racing Conference and the New Zealand Harness Conference and was underwritten by the race clubs of New Zealand. The good news: the codes own the TAB! The bad news: the TAB is broke! Coronavirus has thrown RITA a life-line excuse – or they think it has. It will also become a matter of fact the yet to be released half-year result (ending January 2020) will show RITA was about $4 million behind budget and regardless of the Covid-19 explosion worldwide was heading for another disastrous end of year result. In the SOI (Statement Of Intent) RITA said: “Net profit before distributions for the 2019/20 financial year is budgeted at $165.8 million, an increase of $29.1 million (+21.3%) on the net profit before distributions for 2018/19 of $136.7 million. It is underpinned by a combination of revenue growth including full-year benefits from the new Fixed Odds Betting platform, recovery in elite betting activity, growth in gaming and other key revenue initiatives, and a reduction in operating expenses.” The $165.8 million is a pipedream and is now likely to be closer to $130 million That appeared on the RITA website on 12/11/19. The $165.8 million is a pipedream and is now likely to be closer to $130 million; a budget-miss result of something like $35 million – it’s inevitable the TAB will soon announce stakes money decreases because it’s hard to see the Government fronting with any cash. The reason it gets worse between now and year’s end is because the RITA budget took into account increased profits from two new sport betting options introduced from February, which included something called ‘hockey stick.’ But it hasn’t happened and now with sport cancelled the budget falls into the ‘miss by a mile’ category. The other thing about this story is that it reeks of stage-management by RITA. How else could this story have gone to Stuff had it not been sent in a press release to the media website or a Stuff staff reporter had not received an invitation to attend? Stephen Henry: Coronavirus is threatening to bring down the TAB, which has asked for a cash injection from the Government so it can keep operating. In the story, it said: “Coronavirus is threatening to bring down the TAB, which has asked for a cash injection from the Government so it can keep operating. “It’s serious enough that we have briefed Government today on what it means for us and how they can help, and that includes injecting cash into the business so we can continue to operate. “Henry told stunned workers that everything was being done to minimise its operating costs, including: * Using fewer cameras at race meetings, doing away with Trackside presenters on course, sending fewer production staff, and not operating betting totes. * Cutting a wide range of expenses like travel and overtime – “we should have cut the sausage rolls today.” Chief Operating Officer Stephen Henry quoted above has been part of the leadership team for a considerable period and coincidentally was with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with John Allen before arriving at NZRB – not long after John Allen made the shift. Everyone in racing should be offended by the Henry joke about saving the sausage rolls Everyone in racing should be offended by the Henry joke about saving the sausage rolls when he has been part of the NZRB gravy-train that over two-and-a-half years ago was earmarked for ‘urgent review of the operating costs.’ Needless to say, that review never happened, and Henry remains one of six in the RITA leadership team on a $300,000/year or above salary, and the costs of RITA according to the last annual report was $211 million. Also, Henry mentioned saving travel expenses – that shouldn’t be too difficult given the same annual report says they have been spending $54,000 a week on travel and accommodation. A decent CEO could have gone into NZRB/RITA at any stage in recent history and slashed the costs, but no one in power has displayed either the know-how or the appetite to do it, or both. John Allen was politically appointed, and his tenure cost the industry $200 million when you consider the cost of building the FOB was $50 million and the on-going commitments to pay Paddy Power and Open Bet for five and 10-year terms. Henry’s cost-cutting is too little, too late, and his plea to the Government for a hand-out is certain to get some eyes rolling at the Beehive Henry’s cost-cutting is too little, too late, and his plea to the Government for a hand-out is certain to get some eyes rolling at the Beehive. If three years ago, we’d had a CEO saving just 10 percent per annum of costs – a very achievable target – today we would be $64 million better off. Just 10 percent per annum for three years and racing would not owe the ANZ Bank $35 plus million and wouldn’t be asking the Government to bail-out an institution that is now flat broke. But the thing that racing can say to the Government is that “you have been making all the appointments and this gravy-train is full of ex-Foreign Affairs and Post Office employees – so it’s mostly your fault.’ Since NZRB finished and RITA arrived, the fortunes of racing have continued to decline. Racing was let-down by the failure of RITA to put a big broom through the management and start with Messara’s blank sheet of paper. Nothing changed of any consequence which brought to mind Einstein’s definition of insanity – ‘doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.’ That definition is now a cliché in racing. Dean McKenzie replaced John Allen in January, but on appearances, he looks to have become part of their team rather than making any waves with the introduction of an alternative style of leadership to turn the tide. RITA’s submission to the Select Committee was a massive disappointment to the industry, and McKenzie’s decision to leave the building immediately afterwards and not listen to the three-code submission was rightly viewed with some derision. Information received today tells a different story to the $3.8 million error on bonus bets that Hendry is claiming. And that is, it wasn’t an error but involves some creative accounting that requires an independent investigation. The word of description was ‘smokescreen.’ The original intention this morning wasn’t to write any of the material you have read above. The focus was intended to be a document entitled ‘NZ Racing and Trotting Conferences Off-Course Betting Scheme,’ which came into my possession about three weeks ago. It’s possibly the most important paper for New Zealand racing’s future if indeed it can survive the immediate issues of coronavirus, insolvency, and the prospect of racing closing for a period. The document sets out the formation of the TAB – it’s dated 20th September 1950. It clearly states that the New Zealand Racing Conference and the New Zealand Trotting Conference came together to start the TAB and that the start-up costs were underwritten by the racing clubs of New Zealand. Racing has said this anecdotally for years, but to see it in writing is a big deal – it’s proof the codes and the clubs own the TAB and that the tail has been wagging the dog for years, and that now needs to change. The document is 70-years-old, but unless a subsequent paper exists which cedes the ownership to the Government (and none exists), racing is the rightful owner. The beautiful thing is it makes the proposed legislation of the Racing Reform Bill redundant. The Bill at its first reading can be summarised as a paper that took away all of racing’s rights and decision making, stole the IP, provided the Minister with the eternal right of interference and control, and opened the door for sports to come in and be a partner in the business at no cost to them. It did nothing to improve racing. Ownership of the TAB means that racing can, with pride and a significant degree of scorn towards the pretenders, hold up its middle finger to all that nonsense and say, ‘we’ll have back what’s ours, thank you very much.’ The Transport and Infrastructure Select Committee had a meeting yesterday with the PCO (Parliamentary Counsel Office) to initiate the Bills rewriting, which is expected to incorporate something like 120 changes and became a document far more acceptable to the needs of racing. The second reading of the Racing Reform Bill could now be by mid to late April – that’s if Covid-19 hasn’t closed down parliament by that time? To read the entire Stuff article entitled Coronavirus: TAB in crisis over sports cancellations, click here: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120423822/coronavirus-tab-in-crisis-over-sports-cancellations?cid=facebook.post&fbclid=IwAR06SbVv7X_g6OVHDJyJC5X-FRzjhdzsia-J26iG5uOjWgcXfiR42_s2xNg his, RITA has no money coming in after Wednesday but has an operation that costs over $10 million a week to run – that’s RITA without considering the codes. They owe the bank a minimum of $35 million, possibly $40 million. They will have to go into statutory management, no other choice that I can see. With no racing, it’s a chance to get rid of everyone and reduce to a skeleton staff – that’s what should happen. I have just withdrawn my $152.65 from my TAB account because I don’t want to lose it to the ANZ. Reply 2) get and regardless of the Covid-19 explosion worldwide was heading for another disastrous end of year result. In the SOI (Statement Of Intent) RITA said: “Net profit before distributions for the 2019/20 financial year is budgeted at $165.8 million, an increase of $29.1 million (+21.3%) on the net profit before distributions for 2018/19 of $136.7 million. It is underpinned by a combination of revenue growth including full-year benefits from the new Fixed Odds Betting platform, recovery in elite betting activity, growth in gaming and other key revenue initiatives, and a reduction in operating expenses.” The $165.8 million is a pipedream and is now likely to be closer to $130 million That appeared on the RITA website on 12/11/19. The $165.8 million is a pipedream and is now likely to be closer to $130 million; a budget-miss result of something like $35 million – it’s inevitable the TAB will soon announce stakes money decreases because it’s hard to see the Government fronting with any cash. The reason it gets worse between now and year’s end is because the RITA budget took into account increased profits from two new sport betting options introduced from February, which included something called ‘hockey stick.’ But it hasn’t happened and now with sport cancelled the budget falls into the ‘miss by a mile’ category. The other thing about this story is that it reeks of stage-management by RITA. How else could this story have gone to Stuff had it not been sent in a press release to the media website or a Stuff staff reporter had not received an invitation to attend? Stephen Henry: Coronavirus is threatening to bring down the TAB, which has asked for a cash injection from the Government so it can keep operating. In the story, it said: “Coronavirus is threatening to bring down the TAB, which has asked for a cash injection from the Government so it can keep operating. “It’s serious enough that we have briefed Government today on what it means for us and how they can help, and that includes injecting cash into the business so we can continue to operate. “Henry told stunned workers that everything was being done to minimise its operating costs, including: * Using fewer cameras at race meetings, doing away with Trackside presenters on course, sending fewer production staff, and not operating betting totes. * Cutting a wide range of expenses like travel and overtime – “we should have cut the sausage rolls today.” Chief Operating Officer Stephen Henry quoted above has been part of the leadership team for a considerable period and coincidentally was with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs with John Allen before arriving at NZRB – not long after John Allen made the shift. Everyone in racing should be offended by the Henry joke about saving the sausage rolls Everyone in racing should be offended by the Henry joke about saving the sausage rolls when he has been part of the NZRB gravy-train that over two-and-a-half years ago was earmarked for ‘urgent review of the operating costs.’ Needless to say, that review never happened, and Henry remains one of six in the RITA leadership team on a $300,000/year or above salary, and the costs of RITA according to the last annual report was $211 million. Also, Henry mentioned saving travel expenses – that shouldn’t be too difficult given the same annual report says they have been spending $54,000 a week on travel and accommodation. A decent CEO could have gone into NZRB/RITA at any stage in recent history and slashed the costs, but no one in power has displayed either the know-how or the appetite to do it, or both. John Allen was politically appointed, and his tenure cost the industry $200 million when you consider the cost of building the FOB was $50 million and the on-going commitments to pay Paddy Power and Open Bet for five and 10-year terms. Henry’s cost-cutting is too little, too late, and his plea to the Government for a hand-out is certain to get some eyes rolling at the Beehive Henry’s cost-cutting is too little, too late, and his plea to the Government for a hand-out is certain to get some eyes rolling at the Beehive. If three years ago, we’d had a CEO saving just 10 percent per annum of costs – a very achievable target – today we would be $64 million better off. Just 10 percent per annum for three years and racing would not owe the ANZ Bank $35 plus million and wouldn’t be asking the Government to bail-out an institution that is now flat broke. But the thing that racing can say to the Government is that “you have been making all the appointments and this gravy-train is full of ex-Foreign Affairs and Post Office employees – so it’s mostly your fault.’ Since NZRB finished and RITA arrived, the fortunes of racing have continued to decline. Racing was let-down by the failure of RITA to put a big broom through the management and start with Messara’s blank sheet of paper. Nothing changed of any consequence which brought to mind Einstein’s definition of insanity – ‘doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.’ That definition is now a cliché in racing. Dean McKenzie replaced John Allen in January, but on appearances, he looks to have become part of their team rather than making any waves with the introduction of an alternative style of leadership to turn the tide. RITA’s submission to the Select Committee was a massive disappointment to the industry, and McKenzie’s decision to leave the building immediately afterwards and not listen to the three-code submission was rightly viewed with some derision. Information received today tells a different story to the $3.8 million error on bonus bets that Hendry is claiming. And that is, it wasn’t an error but involves some creative accounting that requires an independent investigation. The word of description was ‘smokescreen.’ The original intention this morning wasn’t to write any of the material you have read above. The focus was intended to be a document entitled ‘NZ Racing and Trotting Conferences Off-Course Betting Scheme,’ which came into my possession about three weeks ago. It’s possibly the most important paper for New Zealand racing’s future if indeed it can survive the immediate issues of coronavirus, insolvency, and the prospect of racing closing for a period. The document sets out the formation of the TAB – it’s dated 20th September 1950. It clearly states that the New Zealand Racing Conference and the New Zealand Trotting Conference came together to start the TAB and that the start-up costs were underwritten by the racing clubs of New Zealand. Racing has said this anecdotally for years, but to see it in writing is a big deal – it’s proof the codes and the clubs own the TAB and that the tail has been wagging the dog for years, and that now needs to change. The document is 70-years-old, but unless a subsequent paper exists which cedes the ownership to the Government (and none exists), racing is the rightful owner. The beautiful thing is it makes the proposed legislation of the Racing Reform Bill redundant. The Bill at its first reading can be summarised as a paper that took away all of racing’s rights and decision making, stole the IP, provided the Minister with the eternal right of interference and control, and opened the door for sports to come in and be a partner in the business at no cost to them. It did nothing to improve racing. Ownership of the TAB means that racing can, with pride and a significant degree of scorn towards the pretenders, hold up its middle finger to all that nonsense and say, ‘we’ll have back what’s ours, thank you very much.’ The Transport and Infrastructure Select Committee had a meeting yesterday with the PCO (Parliamentary Counsel Office) to initiate the Bills rewriting, which is expected to incorporate something like 120 changes and became a document far more acceptable to the needs of racing. The second reading of the Racing Reform Bill could now be by mid to late April – that’s if Covid-19 hasn’t closed down parliament by that time? To read the entire Stuff article entitled Coronavirus: TAB in crisis over sports cancellations, click here: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/coronavirus/120423822/coronavirus-tab-in-crisis-over-sports-cancellations?cid=facebook.post&fbclid=IwAR06SbVv7X_g6OVHDJyJC5X-FRzjhdzsia-J26iG5uOjWgcXfiR42_s2xNg Sharing is caring! 10 thoughts on “The good news and the bad news” Henrietta Bedfordsays: March 20, 2020 at 7:15 pm What criminal fraudulent behaviour. However the people who are really to blame are the people who gave thém thé jobs . In most cases you only had to see them or listen to them speak to know that they were either not equipped for the job, or understood nothing about the job, or cared not at all about the job. What a tragedy for NZ and for an Industry that employs many thousands of people, an Industry that creates big exports and is often a World leader. Reply Adrian Stanleysays: March 22, 2020 at 4:10 pm I would love to go through all the staff in the tab and Nztr, look into their their rolls. Look at salary’s and general exspences for the work they do. I think it could be cut by 50 million straight away. This should of been done years ago Reply Brian de Loresays: March 23, 2020 at 8:53 pm Good observation, Adrian. Consider this, RITA has no money coming in after Wednesday but has an operation that costs over $10 million a week to run – that’s RITA without considering the codes. They owe the bank a minimum of $35 million, possibly $40 million. They will have to go into statutory management, no other choice that I can see. With no racing, it’s a chance to get rid of everyone and reduce to a skeleton staff – that’s what should happen. I have just withdrawn my $152.65 from my TAB account because I don’t want to lose it to the ANZ. Reply Kevin Rooneysays: March 20, 2020 at 7:15 pm Yet another example of the pathetic crap bags of beaucracy who actually think they are important to the industry ie Stephen Henry crysaallised in their little glass towers oblivious to the hard working people at grass roots.trainers ,track riders stablehands who get up at 3am to make the sport happen Having been a HANDS ON dairy farmer for 40 yrs I know and totally understand the rigours of staying in an industry where most of the time the CEOs and their co horts who have never got their hands dirty or got out of bed before 6am have any realisation what drives the industry Keep at the bastards Nihil Bastardum Carborundam Reply Chris Luonisays: March 21, 2020 at 11:04 am New Zealand as we knew it on 1 February will never be the same again for some time. The 1950 document you have unveiled should also be available in the Parliamentary archives so let’s place the onus on the government to prove its non existence. Well done with this exposure and it is a major disappointment that many of our racing leaders and their organisations did not have any idea that this legal document existed. It should be have been considered like the statutory doxs of a company which are filed on record with the Companies Office. A question? What type of entity is the TAB? Eg a company, an incorporated society etc. Reply Brian de Loresays: March 21, 2020 at 11:10 am I understand the TAB is a body corporate, but it should be reclassified as a private company which would allow the codes to negotiate their IP as they see fit Reply Chris Luonisays: March 21, 2020 at 7:02 pm As the galloping and harness codes were the capital subscribers to the formation of the TAB in 1950 are they the only owners of the TAB.? Reply The Omaha kidsays: March 21, 2020 at 7:54 pm Well done Sherlock … Reply Wayne Deegansays: March 22, 2020 at 10:25 pm Can’t believe this great sport of racing has been hijacked by these fat cats who have sucked it dry.Fully support what Kevin Rooney said they would never have got their hands dirty.Well done Brian on your work which has shown up a lot of pigs in a trough.How McKenzie got top job is beyond me following his past performances. Reply Brian de Loresays: March 23, 2020 at 8:56 pm Pigs in the trough is a good description. Couldn’t agree more. The Minister now needs to act quickly in the best interests of racing – this will test him, but I’m not holding my breath! Reply Leave a Reply Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * COMMENT NAME * EMAIL * WEBSITE Search for:SEARCH RECENT POSTS The good news and the bad newsMarch 20, 2020 Messara makes impressive oral submission to complete four weeks of hearingsMarch 6, 2020 Racing sends a strong message to Select CommitteeFebruary 21, 2020 Codes present strongly at Racing Bill hearingsFebruary 15, 2020 Minister Winston Peters says he’s staying true to his wordFebruary 7, 2020 Racing Minister Peters reassures racing he’s staying true to his wordJanuary 31, 2020 Racing industry comes together to protest legislationJanuary 24, 2020 Racing needs its own ‘Magna Carta’January 17, 2020
  2. iwmcn

    The Box Seat-A Question??

    Every day and every action brings us closer to justifying outsourcing communication to SKY and wagering to TABCORP. Unlike NZ they are public companies ACCOUNTABLE to shareholders. Now is the time to act as it has now been proven beyond doubt that the CLUBS have owned the TAB since 1950 Refer to this weeks OPTIMIST for factual confirmation of this. More evidence to give the Industry a greater say in matters and less for the bureaucrats.
  3. iwmcn

    Couch TV Presenters, here’s your chance

    Whats their time frame to make this placement.? Is the individual born yet.?
  4. iwmcn

    Canterbury Trial Videos

    Note that 15 January videos are now posted but not 9 January. I dont accept the excuse that resources are an excuse for not posting the major trials as they and race dates are pre notified well in advance.? Responsible or proactive managers knowing this can happen would plan for this and outsource to cover the bottleneck. Failing that let the Code manage this process and give them a subsidy to do so.? More exposure would generate more turnover.? Can the TAB / HRNZ give us an assurance that in future major trials at least can be posted earlier.?
  5. iwmcn

    Canterbury Trial Videos

    Could I have an explanation please from whoever is responsible as to why videos of the major South Island trials on 9 and 15 January are not available on HRNZs web site some 13 and 7 days later. To whom should one specifically complain. This has been the case for well over 12 months now. I feel the Code is not being well served in this regard. Chertsey T.C. Tue 22 Jan Forbury Park T.C. Sat 19 Jan Auckland T.C. Tue 15 Jan Waikato Bay of Plenty Harness Tue 15 Jan North Canterbury TOA Tue 15 Jan Invercargill H.R.C. Thu 10 Jan Mid Canterbury TOA Wed 09 Jan Nelson O T B Sun 06 Jan Auckland T.C. Sat 05 Jan
  6. iwmcn

    SWEENEYS PRE RACE COMMENTS(BURBLE)

    Thank you. Well put. Its more a case of CREDIBILITY in us acccepting what they (not only him) say. Agree on the great ride.
  7. Was it his intimate knowledge and experience that caused him to dismiss DUPLICITYS chances at Awapuni today or his uncontrollable jaw. His reason was on the grounds that the horse would best be suited to a stronger rider and apologised to Daniel in his pre race comment for saying so.. I believe its more a case of him not only getting egg on his face but the shell too. DUPLICITY WON.
  8. iwmcn

    Justin Evans

    enjoyed his calls. well done.
  9. iwmcn

    The Budget

    Rangi she was very fit, well and crusing according to John Dunn before and after the gallop..
  10. iwmcn

    The Budget

    Your right. Costing me thousands in fixed odds multis. Had 11k going in multis for Jaw D Nancy to place on Friday only to see her gallop having shied at track markers lying on the track. down the back straight. I subscribe to dreams.?
  11. iwmcn

    The Budget

    Guys it is not a case of us and them. The review covers "racing". I accept the Budget said gallops. Blue "racing" has already lived on hope for years not just harness. Now we are seeing ACTION and still whinge about past grievances, Ministers etc. Move on. Await the outcome of the review and reserve any criticism or negativity (if justified) until it is released.
  12. iwmcn

    The Budget

    Lamour Not conversant enough with that to comment about the race fields legisation. I personally have advocated we contract racing to Tabcorp and TV to Sky. Both are public companies ACCOUNTABLE to shareholders. Also rip up the Racing Act and start with a blank piece of paper. I hope Mr Messiah has been reading my mail and concurs..
  13. iwmcn

    The Budget

    Winston has implemented a long overdue review of our Industry which potentially could make millions available to us for distribution without having to get petty cash allocations from the budget. Surely we should wait for the future outcomes before bleating and being critical of Winston.
  14. iwmcn

    Hi Ho Tiz Off To The Park We Go....

    Dont leave Harriet out.Great odds.
  15. iwmcn

    John Allen's latest "conversations"....

    Go back and read a recent article in the Informant which set out John Messiahs view of NZ racing and the direction we should take. The headline read 'start with a blank piece of paper" and create a Racing Act relative to these times and technology. Codes wise he favoured separate administrations controlling their own destiny and not a collective. It was a very thought provoking and constructive interview from an administrator with a proven track record. Read it.