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  1. We're Doomed

    Days Between Runs

    Yes, 2,400m Dunedin Cup one day, 1,600m WFA Timaru Cup the next day.
    3 points
  2. gubellini

    Days Between Runs

    crustyngrizzly Bostock was trained by Frank Hill at Pukekohe. He won 13 races from 173 starts. He won four races at Whangarei. On the 21/3/70 at Whangarei he won R5 over 1.25m and ran third in R8 over 6f. Phil Kempton won 6 on him and John Riordan and Gary Alexander 2 each and Keith Aitken, Terry Midwood and Ray Cleaver 1 each.
    3 points
  3. say no more

    LGL Results

    Week 7 selections
    2 points
  4. Its done, this from HRNZ website...for full story Cheers Iraklis
    2 points
  5. Found Little Vic ! Look at his record from MAY-AUG 1981
    2 points
  6. Ardern said early days she suffered imposter syndrome..It wasnt that, it was the real thing. She could have got away with that if she had associates with ability. But she was surrounded by "no hopers." The cunning Mahuta and Jackson drew her into the web of He Puapua and that was a loser. But it was Auckland that dumped this sorry lot. 100 days locked down while Jacinda worked the microphones in Wellington daily. Disgraceful! We will never forgive that.
    2 points
  7. That's a really interesting question and worthy of discussion. From a form perspective, in terms of highlighting future winners of races down the season, the 2000 Guineas is for me the most significant race of the whole season. Those unplaced at Newmarket often go on to much better things - two examples this season so far are INISHERIN, who was sixth in the classic but has won a Group 2 since and of course CITY OF TROY who won the Derby last Saturday. At the end of the season, the race from which the best quality future winners emerge is usually the 2000 Guineas and it provides the form lines which we see in the big Irish and French races. That's one aspect. There's the issue of whether you have a Guineas winner who is a miler or one who is a potential Derby horse. The Guineas is becoming more of a race for the specialist milers and for that reason I think it will be very difficult for any horse to do the Newmarket-Epsom double in the future. If you are dealing with a 3-y-o miler, it's a long season - from Newmarket to Ascot to (possibly) Goodwood, Longchamp (the Moulin) and now of course the Breeders Cup which has added a new dimension. From a bloodstock viewpoint, does winning the Irish 2000 Guineas add any real value if you've already won at Newmarket? I suspect not but for the placed horses, I can understand trying to get the Group 1 on the record. For Coolmore, whose horses are slow at coming to hand as we've seen (for them the real season runs from Epsom to the Breeders Cup), The Curragh can be useful to bring one forward but it's not as significant a race as it was and it's often targeted by the lesser Irish trainers. The long season makes the 6-week break between Newmarket and Ascot worthwhile - it's an obvious target and the last opportunity for the 3-y-o milers to get that Group 1 against their own age group so you have the English, Irish and perhaps French Guineas winners in the line up along with those who weren't ready for Newmarket or Longchamp but have improved and can stake their own claim for a Group 1 prize - that's why it is the race that it is. From there, the 3-y-o colt milers have to go into the deeper waters against the older types in races like the Sussex and later the Moulin (or the Jean Prat). Those who look to be able to go up to 2000m have the Eclipse and other options but it's no longer just your age group. Ascot is also different to Newmarket and The Curragh in that it's a round mile which can give those who didn't quite get home on the straight tracks a chance. My heretical view is it's silly for the older mile division to have two straight course Group 1 races (the Lockinge and the Queen Anne) but the 3-y-o have the challenge of a corner and the stiff Ascot finish. Just my two cents but it's an interesting topic and it looks like the 2024 renewal of the St James's Palace isn't going to disappoint though it seems the Poulains winner will wait for the Sussex.
    2 points
  8. Roaring Lion’s death from colic at the tender age of four in the summer of 2019 was difficult to take. The charismatic dapple grey had illuminated the preceding Flat season with his thrilling victories in the Eclipse, Juddmonte International, Irish Champion Stakes and Queen Elizabeth II Stakes. He was the apple of the Qatar Racing team’s eye, and was beloved by staff and visitors in what turned out to be his sole season at Tweenhills Stud in Gloucestershire. I always had an especially soft spot for him because he was something of a throwback, running so often over a wide range of trips in his three-year-old campaign; trying his luck in the 2,000 Guineas and Derby early in the season and switching between a mile and ten furlongs by the end of it. It made a refreshing change in an era of distance specialism, when some horses only ever run in sprints, over a mile or in ten to 12-furlong heats. Racing fans were undoubtedly robbed of seeing their hero enjoy a long and enjoyable retirement. But, putting emotion to one side for a moment, were breeders robbed of a great sire? With his sole crop now aged four, there is increasingly sufficient evidence on which to base a judgement. Strictly in terms of numbers, he has been holding his own against stallions with comparable profiles who also retired to stud in 2019. From 98 named four-year-olds he has sired 51 winners in either Flat or jump racing (52 per cent), including ten black-type performers (ten per cent). They are headed by the Group/Grade 1 winner Dubai Mile, now a Manton Park stallion. For Cracksman, the figures are 120 named four-year-olds, 64 winners (53 per cent) and 11 black-type performers (nine per cent). His debut generation has also yielded a single top-level winner – although his, Ace Impact, was an outstanding champion who retired unbeaten. Meanwhile Saxon Warrior has 111 named four-year-olds, 65 winners (59 per cent) and 15 black-type performers (14 per cent). Yet again, there has been one Group/Grade 1 winner among that cohort, in Victoria Road. Roaring Lion is riding high in the Racing Post’s all-important statistics of percentage of runners in Britain and Ireland with RPRs of at least 80 or at least 100 this year, too. His achievement of 52 per cent horses rated 80 or more in 2024 places him seventh behind only Justify, Shamardal, Frankel, Galileo, Kingman and, weirdly, Shalaa, while his figure of 17 per cent runners rated 100 or over puts him in fourth behind Shamardal, Frankel and Zebedee, whose few remaining representatives on the track include the smart Magical Spirit and Pogo. Perhaps the most striking aspect of Roaring Lion’s sadly curtailed stallion career is how much stamina he imparted, though. Headliner Dubai Mile won the Criterium de Saint-Cloud over ten furlongs on heavy ground at two although, like his sire, he showed he was far from being one-dimensional by running a creditable fifth in the 2,000 Guineas at three. Middle Earth meanwhile won the Melrose Handicap and Noel Murless Stakes and Saint George finished runner-up in the Queen’s Vase over 14 furlongs; Lion’s Pride is a Listed scorer over 12 furlongs; and Queen Of The Pride was second in the Daisy Warwick Stakes and Valiant King filled the same position in the Ballyroan Stakes over a mile and a half as well. Furthermore, Running Lion took a Listed race over ten furlongs and Kingswood finished third in the Gallinule Stakes over the same trip. Embesto is Roaring Lion’s only high-class offspring who looks an out-and-out miler, dead-heating in the Sovereign Stakes over that distance. That is perhaps a little surprising, when the sire showed he had some zip when winning the QEII at Ascot. Perhaps it should be no great shock, though, when Roaring Lion’s personal best was his wide-margin victory over Poet’s Word in the Juddmonte International over ten and a half-furlongs at York. His own sire Kitten’s Joy stayed 12 furlongs well and his progeny tend to need at least a mile, and his dam Vionnet, by Kentucky Derby victor Street Sense, was Grade 1-placed over ten furlongs. On top of all that, his champion status and higher fee will have attracted a lot of classically bred mares in that one season at Tweenhills. For example, Dubai Mile is out of Beach Bunny, a Pretty Polly Stakes runner-up by High Chaparral, Middle Earth is out of Roheryn, a 12-furlong Listed winner by Galileo, and Lion’s Pride is a half-brother to Gold Cup hero Courage Mon Ami. Specialising in horses who are best beyond a mile is no bad thing, though, and it has made Roaring Lion progeny attractive for the international market and in the National Hunt sphere, where he has supplied four winners from 12 runners including Scottish Triumph Hurdle second Roaring Legend, as well as the non-winning but fairly useful Mordor, who has finished third three times for Gordon Elliott. Humanity, the six-length winner of an 11-furlong handicap at Kempton last September, was sold to continue his racing career for 240,000gns at the Tattersalls Autumn Horses in Training Sale; Sheradann, who won three times between 11 and 15 furlongs in France last year, was sold to race for Jim Hay in Britain for €250,000 at the Arqana Autumn Sale; and Maasai Mara, a useful middle-distance handicapper, was sold to go hurdling with John O’Shea for 170,000 gns at the Tattersalls July Sale. It’s fair to say that Roaring Lion doesn’t appear to have come up with a true megastar in his own mould, unless one of his less exposed stayers develops into a consistent Cup performer. But that was always more of a hope than a reasonable expectation with just one crop, anyway. Perhaps Kameko, his successor also by Kitten’s Joy in the stallion boxes at Tweenhills, will do that instead. His own first crop, mercifully not also his last, are two-year-olds this season. Roaring Lion could have occupied an important position in the stallion market though, especially now that the tide of popular opinion seems to have turned a little more towards horses who stay ten furlongs and more, as people have woken up to the fact that the increased resale opportunities mitigate the inability to get them out early in their two-year-old season, at least to some extent. It didn’t really need confirming, but the performance of Roaring Lion’s sole crop has reminded us that the thoroughbred realm would be better off with him still being here. Disclosure: Once again not my writing, but worthy of a copy and paste for those that mourned his unfortunate passing here in NZ.
    1 point
  9. Otaki Race 2: Radiant Lass Ruakaka Race 3: Sayan. Thanks John and Scooby.
    1 point
  10. Eagle Farm R5 - Yellow Brick Eagle Farm R6 - Hedged Have broken my number 1 rule for this comp - never back against J Mac or J Kah!! Thanks all
    1 point
  11. Otaki R3- Semper Magico Ruakaka R7- Top Dollar Good luck all.
    1 point
  12. Thank You Legend John Legend . A nice little earner for the weekend Can't wait to the next installment
    1 point
  13. canon47

    5 straight (not poker)

    5 straight wins for Allan Sharrock and apprentice Triston Moodley CONGRADULATIONS in 60 years I've never seen or heard of such an amazing outcome. I'm a little surprised I'm the first to post on this Come on team a lot of you are usely more positive
    1 point
  14. Do you mean.......watch this space yES?
    1 point
  15. Pam Robson

    Days Between Runs

    In those days the Timaru and Dunedin Cups were on two consecutive days ....and I think the Dunedin Cup was first although i stand to be corrected there. A mile and a half back to a mile the next day. I was at Oamaru when I saw a smallish bay horse sporting red and white colours streaking down the straight in a maiden race. Little did I know what I had just witnessed.
    1 point
  16. Blaird

    5 straight (not poker)

    In this day and age that's quite extraordinary
    1 point
  17. Leggy

    Days Between Runs

    Oh no, it was 2 years later. Grey Way beat her in the Stewards. She won the Gold Cup and ran second to Tonic Time in the Churchill. Went on to win the Thames Valley Stakes, Timaru and Dunedin Gold Cups and run second in the Avondale Cup over a 17 day period the next month.
    1 point
  18. gubellini

    Days Between Runs

    Nerula they ran 8 races that day at Patea- Monday April 16, 1906. Results: R1 Hurdles 1.5m - Rangiwhenua ridden by Boyd first- 8 ran R2- 6f- Showman and B.Dalton first- 6 ran R3- WFA 1m- Mooshen first and Mr NA Brown- 4 ran R4- 1.25m- Slavey and C Matthews first- 5 ran R5- 4.5f Rotoiti and C Cochrane first- 12 ran R6- 7f Miss Lancelot and Stevens won- 6 ran R7- 1m Nero and R Barlow won- 3 ran R8- 4.5f Bagatelle and C Matthews first- 12 ran Totalisator Investments £4,611
    1 point
  19. Nerula

    Days Between Runs

    Story for you? ex NZTROF Owners Bulletin. Neil M EXTRACTS RACING DAYS IN OLD PATEA – LARAINE SOLE PATEA MAIL 23 FEBRUARY 1878 “For the second hack race there were nine starters. George’s Rob Roy winning with Russell’s grey Retire second. The grey, quite a pony was much fancied and considering that it had carried the owner from New Plymouth the day before and had been ridden from Hawera the same morning proved that the pony had “go” in it. And Laraine writes – PATEA NOVEMBER 1879. There is a wonderful story told about the jockey who rode Hailstorm to victory in the Patea Cup. A belated letter reached renowned jockey and landowner Duncan Campion on the morning before the Patea meeting offering him a ride on the good horse Hailstorm. Campion left his home Carnarvon at Bulls at midday and rode to Alex Higgie’s Blink Bonny on the No 2 line where he changed horses. After stopping for two hours he rode on and a tired pair arrived at Patea at 6am. He won the Patea Cup on Hailstorm, got beaten in another race on him, saw the racing out that day and rode to Wanganui reaching there at 10pm. He changed horses again and reached Carnarvon at 3am having ridden over 170 miles- the actual travelling just under 27 hours. If he slept it would have been in the saddle. They were tough in those days! AND FROM PAGE 54-55 Not everyone was enamoured with racing as evidenced in part of a letter to the Patea Mail of 20 April 1906 which read, ...on the day following the great Christian festival, a day set apart for rejoicing, the racecourse in nearly every town is thronged with a huge crowd of men and women with excited passion-waved faces all striving to worship Mammon. There was a time when women were scarce on the racecourse: that day is gone. The home-loving woman is fast going, the lusts of excitement, of the delights of the world, are in her blood. She is an habitue of the racecourse today, is well versed in its slang and may even, on occasion, be seen with the jockey hoping that her fascinating smile will get her the coveted “tip.” With mothers, who thus frequent the racecourse, can we wonder that the modern daughter is not gifted with modesty that she is no longer sought but seeks. The high church dignitary is there too, who but the previous day was reading the church services. The church members, in fact, of nearly all denominations, are well represented. The scene on the Patea racecourse on Monday was similar to many others where all sorts of conditions of men and women gathered eager for gain and pleasure. What the Maories (sic) who flock in full force to our local racecourse and grow hilarious on the waipiro of which there is always a plentiful supply, think of our religion and practice only the dusky native himself knows. One thing is certain, civilisation is not tending to raise the Maori. The drink flows, curses abound, money is lost and won and the greatest Christian festival of joy and mirth is turned into a use that can have no other influence on men and women save that of degradation. SPRING 2023 9
    1 point
  20. Palliser

    greyhound racings future

    They need to highlight the great things within the industry like Bob Pringle and Grand Vue Ace, get that story on mainstream .. brilliant. Stop banging on about how great the Cole Kennel is Rosanowski.
    1 point
  21. Mirzann gone so that’s one less RFT. Stablemate has Lane and might be the one.
    1 point
  22. Pam Robson

    Days Between Runs

    AND off nine days work. Stewards [ 6 fur ] Canterbury Gold Cup ] mile and a quarter ] and the Churchill Stakes [ mile ].
    1 point
  23. I just saw an interview with Johnny Dunn and he said he is going to chase that premiership down so all your tickets are W I N N E R S !!!!!!!!
    1 point
  24. Pak Star

    5 straight (not poker)

    Indeed a great accomplishment. It was discussed a bit on the "tips" thread pinned above
    1 point
  25. Leggy

    Days Between Runs

    As a kid I certainly remember open class horses running in both legs of the double 2 races apart, and placing in both. Winning both may have been achieved. And we have the likes of the remarkable Showgate running 3 times in a week at Cup time, all in black type races, with great success.
    1 point
  26. john legend

    Do your job

    Mr Trump did you do anything wrong etc.... no ok !
    1 point
  27. The period between the Derby meeting and the start of Royal Ascot is the quietest of the whole season. A couple of Group 3 races and the odd Listed is all we have across seven meetings in Britain and Ireland on Saturday and another three on Sunday. Nothing much happening in France either. Royal Ascot starts on Tuesday 18th June. I see the Belmont Stakes is being run at Saratoga this year over 2000m - Charlie Appleby runs NATIONS PRIDE and MEASURED TIME in the Grade 1 Metropolitan Handicap over 2100m. The former, with Frankie Dettori onboard (it looks as though Dettori will be at Royal Ascot but it seems less likely he'll be riding) was well held in the Man O'War last time and all his American form is on wet turf. William Buick rides MEASURED TIME who won the Jebel Hatta at Meydan in January and then ran a close fourth in the Dubai Turf over 1800m. I think this trip will be ideal and he has a big chance. Joseph O'Brien has AL RIFFA who chased home subsequent Arc winner ACE IMPACT in the Guillaume D'Ornano at Deauville last August. On re-appearance he was fourth, beaten less than a length, in the Ganay on heavy ground. If he can act on this much quicker turf, he has a significant chance.
    1 point
  28. Thanks Ivan and Pure Steel yes it has got easier having stuck with harness racing for 60 years. We can all come unstuck of course but now have an understanding of a mixture of what is needed to succeed at punting (and what the experts do wrong !!!) Hope you all well
    1 point
  29. Once you've picked your 2 horses and submitted your entry, I'm thinking that Murphys Law might prevail... so I might pick 2 of the others remaining.
    1 point
  30. Pegasus 9

    WHERE IS J MAC ?

    Racenet  MW: The legend of James McDonald keeps growing. His win on Romantic Warrior in Japan not only showed how good a horse he is but how good a jockey J-Mac is. He can win on any horse, anywhere in the world, at the highest level. He's the elite of the elite. Aged only 32, he's not only probably the best jockey in the world, but one of the best sportsmen on the planet. He should be a household name in Australia, but racing does very little to promote its superstars. BD: But I've watched the replay of J-Mac's win in Japan many times and I'm certain that if he didn't give Romantic Warrior the A-grade peach of a ride he did, the horse wouldn't have won. It was remarkable. I loved his exuberance and raw passion crossing the line.
    1 point
  31. My long range tip for this year’s Melbourne Cup is Middle Earth by Roaring Lion.
    1 point